UNSG Personal Envoy to brief Security Council on Western Sahara

Rabat – The United Nations Personal Envoy to the Western Sahara, Christopher Ross, will brief the UN Security Council on Western Sahara next Wednesday.This comes after the United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon released his annual report on the situation in the Western Sahara last Friday.In the report, Ban Ki-Moon summarized the latest developments regarding the question of Western Sahara and called on the different parties in the conflict to “continue their cooperation with the United Nations human rights mechanisms and OHCHR, by facilitating OHCHR missions to Western Sahara and the refugee camps near Tindouf, with unrestricted access to all relevant stakeholders.” The UN Chief also praised the “positive steps that Morocco has taken on the protection of human rights,” including the adoption of a new code on military justice and the accession to the Optional Protocol to the Convention Against torture, while calling for “independent and impartial understanding” of human rights in the Western Sahara.He also called for the registration of the population living in the Tindouf camps.“I note continuing questions about the number of refugees requiring assistance. These highlight the need to address the registration of the refugee population,” the UN chief said in paragraph 77 of his annual report.It is the first time the UNSG’s annual report on the territorial dispute has included a recommendation calling for a census in the Tindouf camps.Conducting a census in the camps has been a longstanding request from the Moroccan government, which has long accused Algeria and the Polisario of inflating the number of people said to be living there.Ban Ki-Moon’s Personal Envoy Christopher Ross has made two trips to the region: one in February and the second in March.Ross’ visit the region was made possible after Ban Ki-moon reassured King Mohammed VI last January that he had no intention to alter the mandate of the MINURSO. read more

Poll Do you feel safe on Irish roads

first_imgRESULTS OF AN AA survey released today show that most Irish motorists believe garda presence on the country’s roads has decreased since last year.The research also revealed that the condition of Irish roads is a major concern for motorists.After a Bank Holiday weekend during which five people were killed in crashes, four in ten people think that the government is not treating road safety as a priority.So far in 2013, 80 people have lost their lives on Irish roads.A combination of factors – a perceived lack of gardaí, a rising death toll and poor road conditions – could be seen as worrying for some drivers, passengers, pedestrians and cyclists. How about you? Do you feel safe on Irish roads? No (1981) Poll Results: Yes (885)center_img YesNoI’m not sureVote I’m not sure (1239)last_img read more

Washington could slip back into a recession

first_imgOLYMPIA — Economic forecasters who had projected that Washington’s economy would begin accelerating in the months to come are now growing increasingly pessimistic, warning Thursday that the risk of slipping back into recession has grown significantly.The state’s chief economist, Arun Raha, said the economy is struggling against headwinds caused by debt battles in the United States and Europe. He had previously forecast that those issues would only cause short-term troubles, but he now expects them to continue to damage consumer confidence and suppress the state’s recovery.“It takes a lot to turn me pessimistic, but I have turned pessimistic now,” Raha said.The Economic and Revenue Forecast Council said state tax collections are already 1.3 percent below a forecast issued in June, and Raha expects that gap to widen in the coming months. The June forecast projected that the state would have a $163 million buffer for the two-year budget cycle, but the weak tax collections in recent weeks have already wiped out about $30 million of that.Raha will issue a new revenue forecast in September that lawmakers will watch closely in case it forces them back to Olympia to reassess the budget. Gov. Chris Gregoire has asked state agencies to prepare for the possibility of more budget cuts, asking them to prepare plans to trim spending by 5 percent and 10 percent.‘Roller coaster ride’Washington had an unemployment rate of 9.2 percent in June. Forecasters no longer have any projection of when Washington’s economic recovery will be able to regain momentum. The debt troubles in Europe appear to be spreading, and the consequences of the United States’ credit rating downgrade by Standard & Poor’s could be lasting.last_img read more

South Florida veterans return from Honor Flight trip

first_imgFORT LAUDERDALE-HOLLYWOOD INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, FLA. (WSVN) – Some of South Florida’s oldest veterans returned from their flight of honor in Fort Lauderdale.Thousands greeted the veterans at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport with flags, cheers and signs, Saturday night.Held by Honor Flight South Florida, the special one-day trip gave 75 veterans of World War II and the Vietnam and Korean wars a chance to visit all three war memorials in Washington, D.C.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

Week In Review 122126

first_imgTuesday 1/23Audio Player01-26-2018-THIS-WEEK-TUESDAY-FINAL.mp3Vm01-26-2018-THIS-WEEK-TUESDAY-FINAL.mp300:00RPd8.0 Earthquake Rattles The Kenai Peninsula, Rescued Cook Inlet Beluga Whale Calf Cannot Be Released Back To Wild, Soldotna Council To Consider Approval Of Airport Master Plan Phase III, What To Do In The Event Of A Tsunami Warning On The Peninsula Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The KSRM News Department compiled some of the top stories from this past week. Wednesday 1/24Audio PlayerJennifer-Wednesday-0124.mp3VmJennifer-Wednesday-0124.mp300:00RPdEarthquake Caused Small Spill At Nikiski Refinery, Three-Peat! Kassik’s Takes Home Third Consecutive Win At Beer And Barley Wine Festival, Ban On Distilleries Serving Cocktails Approved By Board Monday 1/22Audio PlayerJennifer-Monday-0122.mp3VmJennifer-Monday-0122.mp300:00RPdCity Of Kenai Looks At Permits For Dip Net Fishery Vendors, CES Fire Marshall Arrested For DV Assault, Ravn Alaska Agents Stole Roughly $500,000 In Goods, According To Feds, NOAA Donates Funds For ‘Bycatch’ Reduction Programcenter_img Thursday 1/25Audio Player01-26-2018-THIS-WEEK-THURSDAY-FINAL.mp3Vm01-26-2018-THIS-WEEK-THURSDAY-FINAL.mp300:00RPdSmoking Ban Continues To Advance In The Legislature, Project Homeless Connect Offers Basic Care And Comfort To The Kenai, Walker Appoints Lincoln To Vacant Alaska House Seat, Soldotna Parks And Recreation Creates Skating Path At Soldotna Creek Park Friday 1/26Audio PlayerJennifer-on-friday-0126.mp3VmJennifer-on-friday-0126.mp300:00RPdTwo Arrested In Connection With Burglary At Kenai Central High School, Early Morning Collision On Seward Highway Involving Two Semi Trucks, Sen. Murkowski Seeks To Scale Back Plans For Offshore Leasing In Alaska, State Institutes New Review Process For Clemency Requestslast_img read more

OBITUARY Mary E Howard Cleary 90

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — CLEARY, Mary E. (Howard), of Wilmington, formerly of Malden, passed away peacefully on April 27th surrounded by her loving family Devoted wife for 35 years to the late Edward J. Cleary. Beloved mother of Jean Kelly, Lt. Col. USAF, retired and her husband Charles, Maj. USAF retired of Lynn Haven, FL, Edward Cleary and his wife Mary of Brockton, Judith Moffatt and her husband Richard of Wilmington, Richard Cleary and his wife Sandra of Danvers and Mary Ellen Pothier and her husband Paul of Wilmington. Sister of the late Eleanor Ruelle and David Howard. Cherished grandmother of Richard Moffatt and his companion Laura, Tracy Moffatt and her Fiance Eric, Meaghan Kelly, Bryan Cleary and his fiancee Jamie, Joseph Moffatt and his wife Nicole, Patrick Kelly and his fiancee Alexa, Matthew Cleary and his wife Kayce, Lauren Cleary and her companion Phill, Edward Cleary and his fiancee Matthew, Emily Pothier, Stephen Cleary and his fiancee Ashley and Daniel Pothier. Also lovingly survived by her great grandchildren, Alexis Moffatt, Olivia Moffatt, Skylar Cleary, Cooper Kendrick and Kiley Moffatt as well as many nieces and nephews.Mary was born in Malden on December 19, 1928 to Anna and David Howard and shared a wonderful childhood with her siblings, Eleanor and David. She graduated from Girls Catholic High School in 1946 and continued her education at Wyndham secretarial school, graduating in 1947. Mary worked as a medical secretary for many years at an oral surgery practice in Medford. In 1953, Mary married Edward Cleary and they resided in Malden with their five children. Mary and Edward were married for 35 years before Edward passed away in 1989. Mary moved to Wilmington in 2002 to be closer to her daughters Mary Ellen and Judy.Mary’s many loves included shopping, gambling and donating money Publishers Clearing House (proud member since 1969) Mary’s greatest joy in life, however was spending time with her family. Mary was a faithful Catholic and attended almost daily mass at St. Thomas of Villanova Parish in Wilmington.Family and friends are kindly invited to attend a Funeral from the Carroll Funeral Home, 721 Salem Street, (Maplewood Square) MALDEN on Thursday, May 2 at 9 AM followed by a Funeral Mass celebrated in St. Joseph’s Church, 770 Salem St., Malden at 10 AM. Visiting Hours in the Carroll Funeral Home on Wednesday from 4-8 PM. Services will conclude with interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that memorial contributions be made to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.Mary E. (Howard) Cleary(NOTE: The above obituary is from Carroll Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Elizabeth J. “Betty” (Kilpatrick) Valente, 75In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Mary R. (Causi) Marinello, 94In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Reverend Paul W. Berube, 84In “Obituaries”last_img read more

After Article 15 Hrithik Roshans Super 30 fails to halt Kabir Singh

first_imgShahid Kapoor and Kiara Advani in Kabir SinghTwitterThe craze for Kabir Singh does not seem to be dying down any time soon as the Shahid Kapoor starrer is braving the wave of Hrithik Roshan’s Super 30 and Article 15 to make a good collection at the box office.Having rocked the box office in its opening week, Kabir Singh clashed with Article 15 in its second week. Many predicted that its collection will be slowed down by the Ayushmann Khurrana starrer. But it remained rock-steady and in fact, it fared better than the new film in that week. The movie continued to keep the cash registers ringing at the box office in its third week, as there were no big releases.Kabir Singh faced a big threat in the form of the highly-talked about and much-awaited film Super 30, which hit the screens on July 12. The trade analysts predicted that the Hrithik Roshan starrer would not only snatch some screens from it but also drive away a huge chunk of audience. It would surely take a toll on its collection at the box office. Super 30 stillYouTube ScreenshotBut the Shahid Kapoor starrer has been unfazed and undeterred by Super 30. When compared to its third Thursday collection (Rs 3.32 crore net), the Sandeep Reddy Vanga directed movie witnessed some amount of drop in its business on its fourth Friday. But Kabir Singh has gone on to show decent growth on Saturday.Kabir Singh has collected Rs 3.75 crore net at the domestic box office on its fourth Saturday, taking its 23-day total collection to Rs 255.89 crore net. Taran Adarsh tweeted, “#KabirSingh shows big gains on [fourth] Sat… Will maintain the pace on [fourth] Sun… [Week 4] Fri 2.54 cr, Sat 3.75 cr. Total: ₹ 255.89 cr. India biz.”Its collection is bigger than that of Article 15, which collected Rs 2.15 crore net at the Indian box office on its third Saturday, taking its domestic total to Rs 55.83 crore net. Taran Adarsh tweeted, “#Article15 jumps again… Inches closer to ₹ 60 cr… [Week 3] Fri 1.25 cr, Sat 2.15 cr. Total: ₹ 55.83 cr. India biz.” Article 15 stillOn the other hand, Super 30 has shown huge growth on Saturday and crossed Rs 30 crore net mark in two days. Taran Adarsh tweeted, “#Super30 has a turnaround on Day 2… Witnesses super growth at plexes of Tier-2 cities and also shows an upward trend in mass circuits… Will score big numbers on Day 3… Eyes ₹ 50 cr [+/-] weekend… Fri 11.83 cr, Sat 18.19 cr. Total: ₹ 30.02 cr. India biz.”last_img read more

16member Oikya Front delegation to join talks with PM

first_imgOikya Front LeadersA 16-member Jatiya Oikya Front delegation, led by Kamal Hossain, will join the talks with the Bangladesh Awami League president and prime minister Sheikh Hasina at Gana Bhaban on Thursday evening.Senior Oikya Front leaders took the decision at a meeting at Kamal Hossain’s Motijheel chamber on Tuesday evening, JSD president ASM Abdur Rab told newsmen after the meeting, reports UNB.”We’ve warmly accepted the prime minister’s invitation and we’ll go to Gana Bhaban at 7:00pm on Thursday. Our leader Dr Kamal Hossain and our 15 other leaders will go there,” he said.The meeting also finalised the names of the delegation members.Later, a three-member Oikya Front delegation — Gano Forum’s Jaglul Haider and Mostak Ahmed and Nagorik Oikya’s Mominul Islam — carried the list of the delegation members to AL president’s Dhanmondi office around 8:30pm.AL organising secretary Abdur Rahman received the list, Mostak Ahmed told UNB.The delegation members are Kamal Hossain, BNP secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir, standing committee members Khandaker Mosharraf Hossain, Moudud Ahmed, Jamir Uddin Sircar, Mirza Abbas, JSD president ASM Abdur Rab, vice president Tania Rab, general secretary Abdul Malek Ratan, Nagorik Oikya’s Mahmudur Rahman Manna and SM Akarm, Gano Forum general secretary Mostafa Mohsin Montu, executive president Subrata Chowdhury, Jatiya Oikya Prokriya’s Sultan Mohammad Mansur, ABM Mostafa Amin and Gonoshasthaya Kendra founder Dr Zafrulla Chowdhury.Abur Rob said the nation hopes that the dialogue will help resolve the political problem.He said they will discuss Oikyafront’s seven-point demand and all other issues.Replying to a question, the JSD president said the representatives of BNP, JSD, Jatiya Oikya Prokriya, Nagorik Oikya and Gono Forum will be there in the 16-member delegation.Asked whether BNP secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir will be there in the 16-member delegation, he said, “Surely, he’ll join the talks. It’s not possible to hold the dialogue without him (Fakhrul).”Rob said he has been made the spokesman of the Oikyafront.BNP secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alam, standing committee members Khandaker Mosharraf Hossain, Moudud Ahmed JSD president ASM Abdur Rob, vice president Tania Rob, general secretary Abdul Malek Ratan, Gono Forum general secretary Mostafa Mohsin Montu, executive president Subrata Chowdhury, Nagorik Oikya’s Mahmudur Rahman Manna, Jahedur Rahman, Jatiya Oiky Prokriya’s Sultan Mohammad Mansur, ABM Mostafa Amin and Gonoshasthya Kendra founder Dr Zafrullah attended the meeting with Dr Kamal in the chair.On Sunday, Dr Kamal Hossain, in favour of Jatiya Oikyafront, sent a letter to Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina seeking dialogue over the national election.In response to it, Sheikh Hasina sent a letter to Dr Kamal on Tuesday morning and invited Oikyafront leaders to join the dialogue at 7pm on Thursday at Ganobhaban.AL office secretary Abdus Sobhan Golap carried the letter to Dr Kamal Hossain’s Bailey Road residence around 7:45am.In the letter, the Prime Minister said, “Take Salam and greetings. Thank you for your letter dated October 28, 2018. My door is always open for discussion on all constitutional issues for the continuation of the democratic trend earned through immense struggles and sacrifices. So, I invite you (Oikyafront leaders) to Ganobhaban at 7pm on November 1 next as you sought time for talks.”Earlier on Monday, Awami League general secretary Obaidul Quader at a press conference said Sheikh Hasina agreed to sit in dialogue with Jatiya Oikyafront leaders over the next general election.Later at night, he phoned Gono Forum general secretary Mostafa Mohsin Montu seeking the list of Oikyafront delegation for the dialogue.On October 13, BNP together with Dr Kama Hossain-led Jatiya Oikya Prokriya, JSD and Nagorik Oikya launched the Jatiy Oikyafront to press for their seven-point demand.The Oikyafront’s seven-point demand includes installation of a neutral interim government, dissolution of parliament, reconstitution the Election Commission, release of all the political prisoners, deployment of army and cancellation of the move to use Electronic Voting Machines (EVMS) for holding the next polls in fair and acceptable manner.last_img read more

Tonight AFROs First Edition with Sean Yoes Friday October 30

first_imgListen at WEAA Live Stream: http://amber.streamguys.com.4020/live.m3u Last week, the director of the FBI confirmed before Congress that his agency conducted surveillance flights over Ferguson, Missouri as well as Baltimore during the unrest connected to the police killings of Michael Brown and Freddie Gray. The FBI’s activities raise several significant questions, according to the ACLU. We’ll talk to that group’s senior attorney David Rocah, who will also give additional insight into the BCPD’s pilot body camera program. Also, a review of some of this week’s top news stories, as well as fresh reporting on 21st century Jim Crow in Pocomoke City, Maryland with Taya Graham and Stephen Janis of The Real News Network. These stories and more coming up this evening on AFRO’s First Edition with Sean Yoes.last_img read more

Taste on WheelsFood Truck Event Celebration

first_imgTaste of DC will hold Taste on Wheels, a food truck event series celebrating the vibrant food truck scene in the Mid-Atlantic, on June 26 from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at The Yards, 1300 1st St SE. Each event will have 20+ trucks and each will feature a signature “taste” item priced $3 or under! Every general admission attendee will receive a free drink with their admission ticket. Tickets cost $5 for general admission and $19 for bottomless drinks. For more information or to purchase tickets for the event, visit thetasteofdc.org/landing/taste-on-wheels-2016-06-26/.last_img read more

Apple to Introduce Next iPhone on Sept 12

first_img Popular on Variety Apple sent out invitations for the company’s next iPhone event Thursday morning: The company is going to introduce the new device, and possibly other products, at a press event on Sept. 12.The event will be hosted at the Steve Jobs Theater on the company’s new campus in Cupertino, Calif. The invite featured a golden ring, complete with the tag line “gather round,” leading to speculations that the company may possibly also introduce a new Apple Watch, or double down on wireless charging.Apple is widely expected to introduce three new iPhone models, including two high-end successors to the iPhone X. Bloomberg reported last week that this could include a model with a whopping 6.5″ screen.The company may also introduce a new lower-end iPhone in a variety of colors, according to that report. Apple first opened up the Steve Jobs theater to the public for the unveiling of last year’s iPhone X, which came ten years after the introduction of the original iPhone.center_img ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15last_img read more

Whats Next For IP Networks

first_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. 4 min read Paul KorzeniowskiIP networks are ubiquitous. They move information in corporations, transmit data to mobile executives, and support telecommuters. One of the last bastions of proprietary networks has been intelligent building systems and devices, but it appears that IP is now ready to break into that area as well.While networks have been used to automate many types of devices, their prices have been too high for certain markets, such as sensors for lights, temperature controls, actuators, security systems, and appliances. These devices have been largely controlled by proprietary devices and networks, which have been difficult to deploy and support. A consortium of suppliers, the IP for Smart Objects (IPSO) Alliance, wants to change that.The organization plans to use IP to collect and move information from sensors, actuator-equipped devices, and intelligent appliances. The consortium has been trying to align its work with that done by the Internet Engineering Task Force and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Adding more intelligence to industrial devices would enable vendors to develop sophisticated applications, such as end-to-end utility metering, integrated home and building automation, industrial systems, asset tracking, “smart cities,” and “smart grids.”The idea sounds appealing. By going with an IP alternative, companies would be able to move data from industrial networks to corporate networks. Also, maintenance challenges should diminish because network technicians would work with familiar IP-based network management tools rather than be forced to develop new skill sets.Because of the benefits, the IPSO Alliance has gained support from more than two dozen companies. Noteworthy backers include Arch Rock, Cisco, Emerson, Freescale, SAP, and Sun Microsystems. In addition, end users, such as Duke Energy, have decided to lend a hand to the work.While it has appealing attributes, the initiative faces some challenges, starting with a couple of alternate networking options, most notably ZigBee. This networking approach is based on the IEEE’s 802.14.5 standard and supports wireless networks where a network coordinator (or master device) collects information from up to 65,000 remote devices.ZigBee was not built to work with computers but instead with simple home and industrial devices, some so simple that they consist of a network connection, a very unsophisticated CPU, and a pair of AAA batteries. ZigBee’s focus has been on supporting home area network (HAN) functions, such as controlling light switches, smoke detectors, thermostats, appliances, video and audio systems, sprinkler systems, and security products.ZigBee has been a standard since 2002 and is now moving toward large deployments while IPSO is still in the development stage. One area where ZigBee has been gaining traction is advanced metering infrastructure. Energy companies have used wireless technology to push intelligence down to the poles outside of customers’ homes and businesses; ZigBee has the potential to extend their reach into the home.The ZigBee Alliance is an ad hoc association of vendors working together to further that goal. The group developed the Smart Energy public application profile, which outlines a common set of energy management functions and protocols, so different suppliers’ devices can interoperate. In May, the consortium announced that 19 products had been certified as Smart Energy compliant. Also, Southern California Edison announced plans to deploy Itron ZigBee meters to automate energy management for 5.3 million homes and businesses from 2009 through 2012. Dallas utility Oncor Electric Delivery Co. plans to use Landis+Gyr Holdings smart meters to upgrade service for 7 million customers during the next four years. Partly because of such public support, market research firm WTRS expects shipments of ZigBee meters to increase from 500,000 in 2008 to 19 million in 2012 worldwide.At this stage, the IPSO Alliance’s work is more promise than reality. It hopes to have an interoperability program in place by November. The earliest deployments may start is 2009, and large rollouts could be a couple of years away.One other standard has been vying for attention. Nokia has pushed its Wibree technology into the HAN marketplace. Wibree is an extension to the popular Bluetooth technology, one tweaked so it requires less energy and is better able to process data intermittently rather than continuously. It too is in an early stage of development.Now that talk about pushing networking technology down to dumb devices is turning to reality, it raises the question, “Is there anywhere else to drive IP?”Paul Korzeniowski is a Sudbury, Mass.-based freelance writer who has been writing about networking issues for two decades. His work has appeared in Business 2.0, Entrepreneur, Investor’s Business Daily, Newsweek, and InformationWeek.center_img October 14, 2008last_img read more

A Bizarre Form of Water May Exist All Over the Universe

first_img[embedded content]But all this was easy to imagine and hard to trust. The first models used simplified physics, hand-waving their way through the quantum nature of real molecules. Later simulations folded in more quantum effects but still sidestepped the actual equations required to describe multiple quantum bodies interacting, which are too computationally difficult to solve. Instead, they relied on approximations, raising the possibility that the whole scenario could be just a mirage in a simulation. Experiments, meanwhile, couldn’t make the requisite pressures without also generating enough heat to melt even this hardy substance.As the problem simmered, though, planetary scientists developed their own sneaking suspicions that water might have a superionic ice phase. Right around the time when the phase was first predicted, the probe Voyager 2 had sailed into the outer solar system, uncovering something strange about the magnetic fields of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune.The fields around the solar system’s other planets seem to be made up of strongly defined north and south poles, without much other structure. It’s almost as if they have just bar magnets in their centers, aligned with their rotation axes. Planetary scientists chalk this up to “dynamos”: interior regions where conductive fluids rise and swirl as the planet rotates, sprouting massive magnetic fields.By contrast, the magnetic fields emanating from Uranus and Neptune looked lumpier and more complex, with more than two poles. They also don’t align as closely to their planets’ rotation. One way to produce this would be to somehow confine the conducting fluid responsible for the dynamo into just a thin outer shell of the planet, instead of letting it reach down into the core. Of course, though, no real planet contains just water. The ice giants in our solar system also mix in chemical species like methane and ammonia. The extent to which superionic behavior actually occurs in nature is “going to depend on whether these phases still exist when we mix water with other materials,” Stanley said. So far, that isn’t clear, although other researchers have argued superionic ammonia should also exist.Aside from extending their research to other materials, the team also hopes to keep zeroing in on the strange, almost paradoxical duality of their superionic crystals. Just capturing the lattice of oxygen atoms “is clearly the most challenging experiment I have ever done,” said Millot. They haven’t yet seen the ghostly, interstitial flow of protons through the lattice. “Technologically, we are not there yet,” Coppari said, “but the field is growing very fast.”Original story reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine, an editorially independent publication of the Simons Foundation whose mission is to enhance public understanding of science by covering research developments and trends in mathematics and the physical and life sciences.More Great WIRED StoriesAdam Savage on lists and the power of checkboxesThe photographs that paved the way for Apollo 11Star Wars fandom and the immature politics of nostalgiaWhat if AC could help save (not destroy) the planet?Kitty Hawk, flying cars, and the challenges of “going 3D”✨ Optimize your home life with our Gear team’s best picks, from robot vacuums to affordable mattresses to smart speakers.📩 Want more? Sign up for our daily newsletter and never miss our latest and greatest stories But the idea that these planets might have solid cores, which are incapable of generating dynamos, didn’t seem realistic. If you drilled into these ice giants, you would expect to first encounter a layer of ionic water, which would flow, conduct currents and participate in a dynamo. Naively, it seems like even deeper material, at even hotter temperatures, would also be a fluid. “I used to always make jokes that there’s no way the interiors of Uranus and Neptune are actually solid,” said Sabine Stanley at Johns Hopkins University. “But now it turns out they might actually be.”Ice on BlastNow, finally, Coppari, Millot and their team have brought the puzzle pieces together.In an earlier experiment, published last February, the physicists built indirect evidence for superionic ice. They squeezed a droplet of room-temperature water between the pointy ends of two cut diamonds. By the time the pressure raised to about a gigapascal, roughly 10 times that at the bottom of the Marianas Trench, the water had transformed into a tetragonal crystal called ice VI. By about 2 gigapascals, it had switched into ice VII, a denser, cubic form transparent to the naked eye that scientists recently discovered also exists in tiny pockets inside natural diamonds.Then, using the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Millot and colleagues targeted the ice VII, still between diamond anvils. As the laser hit the surface of the diamond, it vaporized material upward, effectively rocketing the diamond away in the opposite direction and sending a shock wave through the ice. Millot’s team found their super-pressurized ice melted at around 4,700 degrees Celsius, about as expected for superionic ice, and that it did conduct electricity thanks to the movement of charged protons. Recently at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics in Brighton, New York, one of the world’s most powerful lasers blasted a droplet of water, creating a shock wave that raised the water’s pressure to millions of atmospheres and its temperature to thousands of degrees. X-rays that beamed through the droplet in the same fraction of a second offered humanity’s first glimpse of water under those extreme conditions.The X-rays revealed that the water inside the shock wave didn’t become a superheated liquid or gas. Paradoxically—but just as physicists squinting at screens in an adjacent room had expected—the atoms froze solid, forming crystalline ice.“You hear the shot,” said Marius Millot of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, and “right away you see that something interesting was happening.” Millot co-led the experiment with Federica Coppari, also of Lawrence Livermore.The findings, published this week in Nature, confirm the existence of “superionic ice,” a new phase of water with bizarre properties. Unlike the familiar ice found in your freezer or at the north pole, superionic ice is black and hot. A cube of it would weigh four times as much as a normal one. It was first theoretically predicted more than 30 years ago, and although it has never been seen until now, scientists think it might be among the most abundant forms of water in the universe.Across the solar system, at least, more water probably exists as superionic ice—filling the interiors of Uranus and Neptune—than in any other phase, including the liquid form sloshing in oceans on Earth, Europa and Enceladus. The discovery of superionic ice potentially solves decades-old puzzles about the composition of these “ice giant” worlds.Including the hexagonal arrangement of water molecules found in common ice, known as “ice Ih,” scientists had already discovered a bewildering 18 architectures of ice crystal. After ice I, which comes in two forms, Ih and Ic, the rest are numbered II through XVII in order of their discovery. (Yes, there is an Ice IX, but it exists only under contrived conditions, unlike the fictional doomsday substance in Kurt Vonnegut’s novel Cat’s Cradle.)Superionic ice can now claim the mantle of Ice XVIII. It’s a new crystal, but with a twist. All the previously known water ices are made of intact water molecules, each with one oxygen atom linked to two hydrogens. But superionic ice, the new measurements confirm, isn’t like that. It exists in a sort of surrealist limbo, part solid, part liquid. Individual water molecules break apart. The oxygen atoms form a cubic lattice, but the hydrogen atoms spill free, flowing like a liquid through the rigid cage of oxygens. Federica Coppari, a physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, with an x-ray diffraction image plate that she and her colleagues used to discover ice XVIII, also known as superionic ice.Eugene Kowaluk/Laboratory for Laser EnergeticsWith those predictions about superionic ice’s bulk properties settled, the new study led by Coppari and Millot took the next step of confirming its structure. “If you really want to prove that something is crystalline, then you need X-ray diffraction,” Salzmann said.Their new experiment skipped ices VI and VII altogether. Instead, the team simply smashed water with laser blasts between diamond anvils. Billionths of a second later, as shock waves rippled through and the water began crystallizing into nanometer-size ice cubes, the scientists used 16 more laser beams to vaporize a thin sliver of iron next to the sample. The resulting hot plasma flooded the crystallizing water with X-rays, which then diffracted from the ice crystals, allowing the team to discern their structure.Atoms in the water had rearranged into the long-predicted but never-before-seen architecture, Ice XVIII: a cubic lattice with oxygen atoms at every corner and the center of each face. “It’s quite a breakthrough,” Coppari said.“The fact that the existence of this phase is not an artifact of quantum molecular dynamic simulations, but is real—­that’s very comforting,” Bove said. And this kind of successful cross-check behind simulations and real superionic ice suggests the ultimate “dream” of material physics researchers might be soon within reach. “You tell me what properties you want in a material, and we’ll go to the computer and figure out theoretically what material and what kind of crystal structure you would need,” said Raymond Jeanloz, a member of the discovery team based at University of California, Berkeley. “The community at large is getting close.”The new analyses also hint that although superionic ice does conduct some electricity, it’s a mushy solid. It would flow over time, but not truly churn. Inside Uranus and Neptune, then, fluid layers might stop about 8,000 kilometers down into the planet, where an enormous mantle of sluggish, superionic ice like Millot’s team produced begins. That would limit most dynamo action to shallower depths, accounting for the planets’ unusual fields.Other planets and moons in the solar system likely don’t host the right interior sweet spots of temperature and pressure to allow for superionic ice. But many ice giant-sized exoplanets might, suggesting the substance could be common inside icy worlds throughout the galaxy. A time-integrated photograph of the X-ray diffraction experiment at the University of Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Giant lasers focus on a water sample to compress it into the superionic phase. Additional laser beams generate an X-ray flash off an iron foil, allowing the researchers to take a snapshot of the compressed water layer.Millot, Coppari, Kowaluk (LLNL)Experts say the discovery of superionic ice vindicates computer predictions, which could help material physicists craft future substances with bespoke properties. And finding the ice required ultrafast measurements and fine control of temperature and pressure, advancing experimental techniques. “All of this would not have been possible, say, five years ago,” said Christoph Salzmann at University College London, who discovered ices XIII, XIV and XV. “It will have a huge impact, for sure.”Depending on whom you ask, superionic ice is either another addition to water’s already cluttered array of avatars or something even stranger. Because its water molecules break apart, said the physicist Livia Bove of France’s National Center for Scientific Research and Pierre and Marie Curie University, it’s not quite a new phase of water. “It’s really a new state of matter,” she said, “which is rather spectacular.”Puzzles Put on IcePhysicists have been after superionic ice for years—ever since a primitive computer simulation led by Pierfranco Demontis in 1988 predicted water would take on this strange, almost metal-like form if you pushed it beyond the map of known ice phases.Under extreme pressure and heat, the simulations suggested, water molecules break. With the oxygen atoms locked in a cubic lattice, “the hydrogens now start to jump from one position in the crystal to another, and jump again, and jump again,” said Millot. The jumps between lattice sites are so fast that the hydrogen atoms—which are ionized, making them essentially positively charged protons—appear to move like a liquid.This suggested superionic ice would conduct electricity, like a metal, with the hydrogens playing the usual role of electrons. Having these loose hydrogen atoms gushing around would also boost the ice’s disorder, or entropy. In turn, that increase in entropy would make this ice much more stable than other kinds of ice crystals, causing its melting point to soar upward.last_img read more

Summer Deal Permanent Authorized Windows 10 and Microsoft Office Keys Lowest Price

first_imgSo all in all you can get a genuine Office and Windows key for just under $50 bucks. While a genuine OS has its upside, it can cost an arm and a leg, but an OEM key from URCDKey can give you the best of both worlds! Head over to the store now to purchase a version of Windows 10 Pro for just $11.74. The listed price during their sale is $14.67 but you can get a futher 20% off using ‘WCCF’ discount code.If you are a DIY PC builder and are looking to grab a copy of Windows 10 and dont want to break the bank this is the way to go. Heck, even if you have the home edition of Windows 10 and wanted the powertools that are available only in the Pro version, this is your chance to get it.Windows 10 is designed to be compatible with the hardware, software, and peripherals you already own and always-enabled updates help you stay current on features and security for the supported lifetime of your device.Windows 10 gives you absolutely the best experience for doing what you do. Gaming just got even better with Windows 10. Not only do your existing games work great, but now you can play and connect with gamers across Xbox One and Windows 10 devices. From the best casual games to a new generation of PC gaming, Windows 10 is built for games you love.Download Windows 10 Pro here first , after you install it, then activate with the code.You can also get Office 2016 and Office 2019 Professional Keys for just $31.1 and $53.44 with the WCCF discount code!To get Windows 10 Pro permanent authorized key, head on here: (it will be $11.74 with code)To get Office 2016 Professional Plus CD Key Global, head on here: (it will be $31.18 with code)To get the Office 2019 Professional Plus CD Key Global, (It will be $48.11 after using the code) head on here. Share Tweet Submitcenter_img Ethics disclaimer: This is a paid-for, sponsored post. We do not earn any commission on sales.URCDKey, an online retailer for keys and codes for various software is offering an exclusive deal on genuine, permanent and Windows 10 Pro OEM keys that you can buy for a bargain! They are already offering a big discount on the list price of almost 50 bucks and using the discount code WCCF, you can bring the price down even more!Get flat 20% off on Windows 10 Pro OEM CDKey with the “WCCF” discount code during URCDKey Summer SaleThe Windows 10 May 2019 update is one of the most stable builds recent builds around and one of the major advantages of having a completely genuine OS is that you can access the Windows store in its entirety. You can download and play demos of Microsoft exclusive titles (Forza for example) and basically do a lot more stuff as compared to pirated windows.last_img read more

VIDEO Defining the NeoLVOT in Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement

first_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Additional articles and videos on Henry Ford Hospital  Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 8:12Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -8:12 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Technology Reports View all 9 items Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Information Technology View all 220 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Conference Coverage View all 396 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Videos | Cardiac Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: Defining the Neo-LVOT in Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Women’s Health View all 62 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director of structural heart imaging, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich., explains how patient survival depends on keeping the left ventricular outflow track (LVOT) clear and using 3-D imaging to predict what the neo-LVOT will look like prior to transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) procedures. The close proximity between the aortic and mitral valves in the left ventricle anatomy makes it critical to assess any mitral valve overhang that will obstruct blood flow out of the left ventricle. This issue has been raised in several cardiovascular imaging structural heart intervention planning sessions at conferences over the past two years, most notably at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT).Read the related article Interventional Imagers: The Conductors of the Heart Team Orchestra, which Wang helped author.Watch the related VIDEO: Overview of the Henry Ford Hospital Structural Heart Program. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients Firstlast_img read more

Helen Hartnett VP Finance and Operations with SVG Partners appears on this

first_imgI talk to Helen Hartnett VP Finance and Operations with SVG Partners. Helen talks about her background, what the ITLG Silicon Valley internship does and how it was conceived. Helen also talks about the week hosting the ITLG young innovators from Gort community school in C0 Galway went, what SVG Partners do, and how SVG Partners decide what startups to invest in. Helen Hartnett on the Irish Tech News Podcastlast_img

Estimated direct economic impact of Airbnb in Ireland in 2018 valued at

first_imgAirbnb host income and guest spending were estimated to be worth over €700 million (€704,277,585) to the Irish economy in 2018 and globally exceeded €86 billion across 30 countries, according to data released by the company today.Almost 1.8 million visitors to Ireland last year used Airbnb for some, or all, of their visit to the country. Travellers who stayed with Airbnb spent an estimated €537 million in Ireland during their trip or €116 on average per day.Hosts in Ireland also saw a boost to their income, collectively earning €168 million (€167,466,473) by sharing their space on Airbnb in 2018.The data reveals the most popular destinations for visitors outside the main urban centres in Ireland. Based on visitor numbers in 2018, the top five destinations in Ireland for Airbnb guests are:– Killarney– Dingle– Westport– Tralee– KilkennySpeaking about the release of the data, Jean Hoey, Public Policy Lead for Ireland, said, “Airbnb has transformed the way people travel, helping visitors to stay and explore in Ireland beyond the traditional destinations and hotspots. Our community of hosts and guests is helping to spread the benefits of domestic and overseas tourism and putting money in the pockets of local families, businesses and communities. With new regulations coming into effect on Monday, we are continuing to work with our host community to help them understand and comply with the new rules.”This growth is accompanied by insights from the Airbnb community, which found:– The majority of overseas visitors to Ireland arrived from the USA, followed by Great Britain, France and Germany– Domestic travel made up almost 20% of all Airbnb guest arrivals across Ireland79% of guests who stayed with Airbnb in Ireland say they use the platform to live like a local– Around the world, 50% of travellers who saved money staying with Airbnb spent it in the neighbourhood they call home during their trip– Those who say Airbnb impacted the length of their stay on average added 4.3 days to their trip.– Guests are also benefiting from hosts’ knowledge of the local area, with 84% of hosts saying they recommend restaurants and cafes to guests and 69% offering their knowledge on cultural activities such as museums, festivals and historical sites.last_img read more

Two injured in N3 crash

first_imgWebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite An accident along the N3 highway yesterday afternoon (Wednesday) saw a car flipping upside down and landing in the oncoming lanes.An elderly woman and son were travelling in the northbound lanes when she allegedly lost control of the vehicle. The car went off the road, flipped upside down and landed next to the southbound lanes. ER24 rushed to the scene, where they stabilised the injured before transporting them to hospital. The elderly woman sustained moderate injuries and her son slight injuries.last_img read more

This story is exclusive to Fresh Fruit Portal If

first_img This story is exclusive to Fresh Fruit Portal. If you would like to reproduce any elements of it on other sites or publications, please make a request to our editorial team at news@freshfruitportal.com (Source: USDA Market News via Agronometrics)Looking at the blueberry markets, there are loads of stories that can be told. For example, how producers have been working to fill the commercial windows mentioned –  with incredible growth from Mexico and a focus on the April window, while Peru has been targeting the gap around October.Another story we are looking forward to covering is the dramatic events happening during the U.S., where the freezes in the southern states and California are driving prices to the highest April and June have seen yet.US Blueberry Movements by Month in Lbs, Comparing the Last Four Years(Source: USDA Market News via Agronometrics)In our mini-series, we work to tell some of the stories that are moving the industry. Feel free to take a look a some of the other articles listed below.Avocados:Avocados in Charts: Dynamic growth and opportunities in the U.S. marketAvocados in Charts: California at the heart of the US marketAvocados in Charts: Peru – An opening window of opportunityAgronometrics is a data visualization tool built to help the industry make sense of the huge amounts of data that you depend on. We strive to help farmers, shippers, buyers, sellers, movers and shakers get an objective point of view on the markets to help them make informed strategic decisions. If you found the information and the charts from this article useful, feel free to visit us at www.agronometrics.com where you can easily recreate these same graphs, or explore the other 20 fruits we currently track, creating your own reports automatically updated with the latest data daily.If you would like to prioritize any particular commodity, please let us know in the comments.www.freshfruitportal.com June 19 , 2018 Colombia’s blueberry industry “developing quite we … T&G ships U.S. blueberries to Vietnam for the … Pricing has strongly supported this level of growth, maintaining the yearly weighted average fluctuating between US$3.00 and US$3.30 per pound. Average pricing in 2017 reached a nearly all-time high of US$3.29 per pound.Blueberry Shipping Point Prices per Lb in USD(Source: USDA Market News via Agronometrics)The choppiness of the U.S. market prices and volumes are reflective of the intense seasonality that marks the industry, leaving two distinctive commercial windows with high pricing right around April and October.US Blueberry Shipping Point Prices per Lb, by Month, Comparing the Last Four Yearscenter_img You might also be interested in In this ‘in charts’ mini-series of articles, Colin Fain of data visualization tool Agronometrics illustrates how the U.S. market is evolving. In each series, he will look at a different fruit commodity, focusing on a different origin in each installment to see what factors are driving change.Over the last eight years, blueberries have seen impressive growth. They have gone from being featured as a common ingredient in cobblers, muffins and pancakes, to taking a new life as a superfood giving smoothies and breakfast cereals an extra antioxidant boost.In 2017, the industry moved 38% more volume than in 2010 – an impressive level of growth, especially given the complexities of bringing this delicate fruit to market.Blueberry Movements in Lbs(Source: USDA Market News via Agronometrics) Successful International Blueberry Summit “raised … Blueberries in Charts: Finding opportunities in th …last_img read more

Pitcairn Islands Announce 2019 Solar Eclipse Tour

first_img2019 is shaping up to be a watershed year for Pitcairn Islands tourism.Following their application to be a Dark Sky Sanctuary and recently announced new shipping service, Pitcairn Islands Tourism has today launched an exclusive tour to celebrate the Total Solar Eclipse which will pass over the Pitcairn Islands in July 2019.The 18-night/19-day tour includes 11 days cruising around the remote Pitcairn Islands, the world’s 3rd largest marine reserve, visiting UNESCO World Heritage listed Henderson Island, Oeno Island to view the Solar Eclipse and a 4 day stay on Pitcairn Island, home of the descendants of the HMAV Bounty mutineers since 1790.  Pre and post stopovers in Tahiti are also included.This once in a lifetime opportunity is only available to 10 guests and is being escorted by distinguished astronomer, Emeritus Professor John Hearnshaw from New Zealand’s University of Canterbury.Making the announcement, Pitcairn Travel Coordinator, Heather Menzies said, “With our new ship MV Bravo Supporter coming on line we are looking to open up new markets and the Solar Eclipse presents us with a unique opportunity to showcase The Pitcairn Islands like never before.”Departing on 22 July 2019, the tour is now on sale with an early bird offer starting from NZ$16,250 per person.  The tour price includes 4 nights accommodation in Tahiti with transfers, half day tour and breakfasts; return flights between Tahiti and Mangareva (to meet the ship); 11 days aboard MV Bravo Supporter with all meals; 4 days homestay on Pitcairn Island with all meals, island touring program and transfers plus Eclipse viewing at sea and visits to Oeno and Henderson Islands.For more information and to book your place on this unique tour visit http://www.visitpitcairn.pn/go_there/eclipse/index.htmlABOUT THE PITCAIRN ISLANDS The Pitcairn Islands are a group of four islands in the southern Pacific Ocean that comprise the last remaining British Overseas Territory in the Pacific. Only Pitcairn Island, the second largest, is inhabited. Located halfway between New Zealand and Peru, with a lush and fertile climate, Pitcairn has a colourful history. In 1789 Fletcher Christian led a mutiny on the English vessel, HMAV Bounty and, several months later, together with 8 fellow mutineers and 19 Polynesians, sailed the ship to Pitcairn Island, one of the most remote and isolated islands in the world.  By 1808, when the tiny colony was rediscovered, all but one of the mutineers and all the Polynesian men had died. The surviving mutineer, John Adams, eleven Polynesian women and twenty-five children remained. Today, almost all of the 50 or so inhabitants of Pitcairn are direct descendants of the Bounty mutineers and their Polynesian consorts.  For more information visit: www.visitpitcairn.pnIn September 2018, Opstad Shipping of Norway, signed a contract with the Government of the Pitcairn Islands to provide a Passenger and Cargo service for the Island with MV Bravo Supporter. Further details can be viewed at: http://www.visitpitcairn.pn/go_there/bravo_supporter/index.htmlThe post Pitcairn Islands Announce 2019 Solar Eclipse Tour appeared first on Discover the South Pacific.Source: Bloglast_img read more