Terry turns down chance to join Spartak Moscow

first_imgThe 37-year-old defender was believed to have been offered a wages in the region of £3 million ($3.9 million) for a one-year deal.Spartak appeared confident of securing the high-profile signing, announcing on social media that they were preparing for “a very important guest”.But after weighing up the move with his family, Terry, who has two children with his wife Toni, has opted against making the switch to Moscow.“After considerable thought, I have decided to decline a contract offer from Spartak Moscow. I would like to take the opportunity to thank Spartak and wish them and their supporters well for the rest of the season,” Terry wrote on his official Instagram account.“They are an ambitious club and I have been very impressed with their professionalism.“But after assessing this move with my family, we’ve decided this is not the right move for ourselves at this time. Good luck Spartak.”Terry spent last season with Championship side Aston Villa, but left after they failed to win promotion to the Premier League.Following Villa’s play-off final loss to Fulham, Terry had considered retiring, but he told the Daily Mail on Saturday that he is keen to keep playing as long as possible.Terry was one of Chelsea’s most decorated players, winning five Premier Leagues, five FA Cups and the 2012 Champions League during his time at Stamford Bridge.He also won 78 caps for England and captained his country on numerous occasions before being stripped of the armband after the Football Association ruled he had racially abused QPR’s Anton Ferdinand.0Shares0000(Visited 3 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Former Chelsea defender John Terry has rejected the chance to join Spartak Moscow© AFP OLLY GREENWOODLONDON, United Kingdom, Sep 13 – Former Chelsea and England star John Terry has rejected the chance to make a shock move to Russian club Spartak Moscow.Terry was reported to be on the verge of signing for Spartak after being flown by private jet to Rome on Friday for a medical.last_img read more

Video: Team South Africa’s champions

first_imgThe International Marketing Council of South Africa’s latest television advert celebrates ordinary South Africans as the “champions” who will make the 2009 Fifa Confederations Cup and 2010 World Cup a success.Click arrow to play video.Posted on SouthAfrica.info on 11 May 2009.last_img

NBA: Leonard’s rehab going slower than Parker’s, coach Popovich says

first_imgSan Antonio Spurs’ LaMarcus Aldridge (12) and Tony Parker, of France, congratulate Spurs forward Kawhi Leonard (2) after his go-ahead 3-point basket with less than 30 seconds left in the fourth quarter of an NBA basketball game against the Houston Rockets, Monday, March 6, 2017, in San Antonio. San Antonio won 112-110.  AP/Darren AbateThe San Antonio Spurs have managed a strong start to the 2017-2018 NBA season so far, notching a 6-4 record despite the absence of cornerstones Kawhi Leonard and Tony Parker due to injuries.Parker appeared to have suffered the more serious setback, rupturing his quadriceps tendon during the playoffs last season, while Leonard is currently nursing a badly sprained ankle from the post-season as well.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Folayang banking on experience against Nguyen: ‘I have been fighting for a long time’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 MOST READ Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohortcenter_img Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion NBA: Kawhi, George seek more for Clippers than beating Lakers PLAY LIST 01:48NBA: Kawhi, George seek more for Clippers than beating Lakers00:50Trending Articles01:15DOH wants a drug rehab center in every region01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games However, Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich revealed that the speedy point guard is most likely to return to the hardwood earlier than the lanky superstar.“He’s just coming along more slowly, for whatever reason,” the three-time NBA Coach of the Year described Leonard’s rehab process to San Antonio Express-News’ Tom Orsborn.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“It’s just been more difficult for him to get through the rehab routine. His body hasn’t reacted the same way.”“Pop” also asked fans to be a tad more patient, as both players are striving to get back on the court and are on the right track back to being fully healthy. Read Next “Tony is at the point where he has been going five-on-five and that sort of thing. He’s not totally confident. It will be a few more weeks,” he said.  “But he’s definitely going in the right direction, and so is Kawhi. It’s just been taking a little bit longer,” he said.  Khristian Ibarrola /ra John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC View commentslast_img read more

Davis Cup: Weather spoils the fun for Indians

first_imgSomdev Devvarman celebrates with Indian team members after his win on Sunday.With the Davis Cup World Group play-off tie locked at two-all, Yuki Bhambri, after losing the opening set, had just broken Filip Krajinovic’s serve when the heavens opened. Play was halted for the night and so was India’s fightback after a remarkable come-from-behind victory by Somdev Devvarman earlier in the evening.After Somdev’s outstanding victory, Yuki lost the first set 3-6 and the second set was in the balance at four-all when bucketfuls of rain came down at the KSLTA courts, forcing play to be suspended.The Yuki-Filip match will resume at 12 noon on Monday to decide which team reaches the top-16 and which gets relegated to Group 1.In the first reverse singles rubber, Serbian Dusan Lajovic rattled through the first set and was leading 2-1 in the next when India captain Anand Amritraj, with his lush grey hair glinting in the Bangalore sunshine, came up to Somdev to give him a pep talk.Serbia, the World No. 2 team, had its foot firmly in the World Group before Somdev changed the complexion of the match and registered a 1-6, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2 win over Lajovic, ranked 83 places above the 144th-ranked Indian.His win pushed the tie, in which India were 0-2 down on the opening day, into the fifth rubber.The Bangalore crowd witnessed two top quality matches in as many days and ensured their decibel levels never came down as the Indian team thrived in the environment.advertisementSomdev showed experience, class and temperament to overcome a stiff challenge from Lajovic, who has had decent success this year.The big serving Lajovic looked to have found his touch straightaway and Somdev seemed to be in the same mode that he was in during his defeat in the second singles rubber on the opening day against Krajinovic.The top-ranked Indian seemed to have no clue how to tackle Lajovic’s serves. But Somdev regrouped. After Amritraj’s pep talk, he suddenly looked a different player and not only did he hold his serve but nerve as well.”I kept telling myself ‘just hang on’ in there. I thought I didn’t have a chance against his serves but I really can’t figure out what happened and suddenly, I got everything going,” Somdev said.He got a break point in the 10th game of the second set and capitalized on it to draw parity. The Indian had the third set firmly in his grip and was leading 4-1 before Lajovic battled his way back to surge to a 5-4 lead and then broke Somdev again to take the set.Somdev targeted Lajovic’s backhand and, at times, faltered, but he persisted and that finally paid rich dividends. The fourth set was a see-saw battle which Somdev eked out with his experience, and in the decider, the Indian broke the Serbian in the third and seventh games and then served out the match.”I was serving well and all of sudden I got tired midway in the second set and it continued till the fifth set. Somdev raised his game and slowed the match which really helped him. He started to return well and I lost confidence in my serves and service is very crucial at high altitudes,” said Lajovic.last_img read more

10 months agoPremier League trio eyeing Ipswich whiz Andre Dozzell

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Premier League trio eyeing Ipswich whiz Andre Dozzellby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveIpswich ace Andre Dozzell is back on the radar of Premier League clubs.The Mirror says Bournemouth, Brighton and Crystal Palace are all tracking fit-again Dozzell.The 19-year-old midfielder – valued at £5 million by the Tractor Boys – is back in action after suffering a cruciate ligament injury on the opening day of last season that ruled him out for more than a year.Dozzell was a member of the England side that won the Under-17 and Under- 19 European titles in 2016 and 2017 respectively.Ipswich, rock-bottom of the Championship and 10 points from safety, may be tempted to cash in to help fund new signings in their desperate bid to beat the drop. last_img read more

Charlie Strong Says Texas Is “Trying” To Work Something Out With Texas A&M

first_imgCharlie Strong dons a cowboy hat.Twitter/@ThisIsMachadoTexas and Texas A&M haven’t met on the gridiron since 2011, but it certainly seems like Longhorns head coach Charlie Strong is open to the idea of resuming the series. Friday, according to OrangeBlood’s Anwar Richardson, Strong, at the Touchdown Club of Houston, said that Texas is “trying” to work something out with its old rival. Richardson is also reporting, however, that Texas itself says no specifics have been discussed. So perhaps Strong got a little ahead of himself.Texas coach Charlie Strong was asked when the Longhorns would play Texas A&M again. Said there is something being worked out— Anwar Richardson (@AnwarRichardson) June 10, 2016Texas coach Charlie Strong says something is being worked out to play Texas A&M again pic.twitter.com/RZVHNpGGs7— Anwar Richardson (@AnwarRichardson) June 10, 2016A UT spokesperson said no specifics have been discussed about Texas playing Texas A&M again when asked about Charlie Strong’s comment— Anwar Richardson (@AnwarRichardson) June 10, 2016Texas vs. Texas A&M used to be an annual affair – until the Aggies left the Big 12 for the SEC. It’s certainly one of the rivalries that college football fans miss the most.last_img read more

Ban on Smoking – Health Ministry Clarifies Public Places

first_img A public place is defined as any structure accessible to the public The ban aims to protect children, non-smokers and workers Story Highlightscenter_img The Ministry of Health has clarified the term public places, as it continues its thrust to educate the public about the new Public Health (Tobacco Control) Regulations 2013, which ban smoking in public places. The Regulations came into effect on July 15.The Public Health (Tobacco Regulations) 2013 stipulate that individuals should not inhale or exhale emissions of the ignited tobacco or tobacco products within a five-metre radius of the entrance, exit, window or area of ventilation of a public place.Speaking at a JIS ‘Think Tank’ on July 16, Legal Officer at the Ministry, Sheryl Dennis, said that the designation of a public place has been properly crafted within the legislation, and is defined as “any structure, facility or enclosed space that is accessible to the public.”A public place, Ms. Dennis said, can also be any place of assembly, or any place of collective use by the public. She also pointed out that an ‘enclosed’ place refers to any space that is covered by a roof, or enclosed by one or more walls or sides, regardless of whether the structure is permanent or temporary.Under the Second Schedule of the Regulations, smoking is prohibited or banned on public conveyances; all government-owned and occupied buildings; and health facilities, including pharmacies.Smoking is also not allowed in sports, athletic and recreational facilities designated for public use; educational institutions; bus stops; as well as areas specifically for use by children.Ms. Dennis advised that smoking is also prohibited in work places; as one of the Ministry’s roles is to protect and safeguard the health and well being of workers in keeping with the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act.The Legal Officer said that a work place “is any space that is used by someone for employment purposes, or in their trade or business.” Continuing, she noted that a home can also be classified as a workplace, where a helper, gardener, painter, or any other person is contracted to carry out services for an ‘employer’ during a given time frame.“We are of the view that a person should not have to choose between their health and their employment,” Ms. Dennis emphasized.She also pointed out that there is a particular section in the Tobacco Regulations that “provides that where an employee is, or has been disadvantaged in any way by virtue of taking steps to protect his or her health, then the employer can be held liable in that regard.”Minister of Health, Hon. Dr. Fenton Ferguson, reiterated at the ‘Think Tank’, that the ban on smoking in public places aims to protect children, non-smokers and workers, and that its introduction was not a sudden decision by the Government.Rather, the Minister said the move by the Government is in keeping with international obligations under the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) that was signed in 2003 by Jamaica and other countries worldwide.last_img read more

Fate of Atishi Lovely and Gambhir sealed

first_imgNew Delhi: East Delhi woke up to a brisk start as Delhi went to polls on Sunday. The constituency which snail-paced in the morning in terms of voting percentage picked up pace in the afternoon and closed at approximately 61.95, third after North East Delhi which scored 63.45 topping the list followed by Chandni Chowk which came second with 62.69 percent. With this, the fate of AAP candidate from East Delhi Atishi, BJP’s Gautam Gambhir and Congress Arvinder Singh Lovely is locked in the EVMs.The educational background of Atishi is up against the stardom of BJP’s Gautam Gambhir and the experience of Congress candidate Arvinder Singh Lovely. Cricketer-turned-politician Gautam Gambhir, who is also the BJP candidate from east Delhi on Sunday voted along with his wife at a polling station in Old Rajendra Nagar area. “I urge the voters especially the first time voters to come to vote because voting is the biggest power one has. Even the voters should bring in their friends to the polling booths,’ Gambhir urged Delhi residents after casting his vote early morning. However, Atishi felt that women security is the biggest issue which women of east Delhi would vote for. Stepping out after casting her vote she appeared confident of her win. “I think women security is the biggest issue in East Delhi, especially for areas like Trilopuri and kalyanpuri where women struggle with illegal liquor being sold in the areas . It is, however, a clear battle between AAP and BJP and the silent voter has always been a voter of AAP,” Atishi said. “This is not an election for Arvinder Singh Lovely, it is an election for trans Yamuna people. The celebrity status of Gambir won’t work, we have seen Chetan Chauhan earlier, people haven’t seen him again,” Arvinder Singh Lovely said.last_img read more

Theres A Difference Between Broke And Bankrupt For ExNFL Players

Torre’s segment begins at 42:00. Embed Code It’s worth mentioning, for the uninitiated, that NBER working papers have not yet been peer reviewed.3Full disclosure: In college, my introductory economics professor was Martin Feldstein, president emeritus of, yes, the National Bureau of Economic Research (and a man who, in his capacity as former chief economic adviser to President Ronald Reagan, inspired the creation of another, very different course). As the preamble to FiveThirtyEight’s In the Papers series perpetually explains, the papers’ “conclusions are preliminary (and occasionally flat-out wrong).” But as crude as the methodology of this particular study may be, it does seem to be a useful analysis of a defined subset of NFL draftees. Had the paper existed back when I reported that 2009 SI article on how and why athletes lose their money, I would’ve added it — caveats included — to the depressingly brief roll call of academic research in this field.And that’s why one of the paper’s other prominent findings, as announced in a note from the authors, was so jarring to read. “The result of our comprehensive research on bankruptcy risk among NFL players,” they wrote, “is quite different from a widely-cited Sports Illustrated article, which reported that 78 percent of former NFL players are bankrupt or under ‘financial stress’ within two years of retirement (Torre, 2009). After 2 years of retirement, only about 1.9 percent of players in our sample have filed for bankruptcy.”One blog used that first sentence as the basis of a headline. In terms of economist trash talk, this was basically the authors flexing.But their summary of the 78 percent statistic was incomplete. Here is what my SI story said: “Reports from a host of sources (athletes, players’ associations, agents and financial advisers) indicate that: By the time they have been retired for two years, 78 percent of former NFL players have gone bankrupt or are under financial stress because of joblessness or divorce.”I called up the California Institute of Technology’s Kyle Carlson, one of the authors of the working paper, and mentioned this discrepancy. I pointed out that excluding the details about joblessness and divorce helped mask the difficulty of measuring a personal, complex issue. Financial health cannot be comprehensively captured by whether a person filed for bankruptcy or not. That their results are “quite different” from, well, an entirely different study should be surprising to approximately zero people.Bankruptcy, by definition, is an elective legal proceeding wherein a person publicly admits an inability to pay outstanding debts. It is also a sufficient but absolutely not necessary condition for defining financial stress; for various reasons, bankruptcy and financial stress can even be mutually exclusive. In my reporting, I have met athlete after athlete who knew to avoid the headline-generating shame of a bankruptcy filing. Even if their finances remained a shambles. Even if they were, by any reasonable standard, broke.Consider former NBA guard Allen Iverson, or ex-NFL receiver Raghib “Rocket” Ismail — whose case, by no coincidence, leads off that SI story — both of whom never filed for bankruptcy despite squandering their pro fortunes.“Bankruptcy is only one measure of a person’s status,” Carlson admitted to me. “It’s what we could get data on. There are many other ways in which a person could be in financial trouble. You might think of our number as maybe a lower bound for the number of guys who are actually in trouble.”And yet what Carlson called a “narrow” academic paper was promising a definitive analysis of a larger, albeit related, problem. Due to the academic marketplace — “Publish or perish” is an idiom for a reason — working papers tend to be hungry and ambitious. The goal is to make it into a journal and contribute knowledge to the world. But it can be tough to find the kind of dramatic angle that makes for an eye-catching study.Measuring financial health just through bankruptcy would be the equivalent of, say, assessing the mental health of a population by just tracking suicide rates, ignoring any other indicators of psychological stress. Pain isn’t exclusively about disaster.You often hear data people say that sample size matters. It’s not just size, though; it’s also the quality of the sample itself. Yes, the authors tell us about 2,016 players who were drafted by NFL teams between 1996 and 2003. But thanks to the relative inaccessibility of data on undrafted players, they also left out every player who didn’t begin his career by shaking hands with an NFL executive on a televised stage. In 2013, according to the Elias Sports Bureau, 638 undrafted players were on active rosters for at least one game — a staggering 31.4 percent of the entire NFL. And that does not even include the drafted or undrafted players who never make it to an active roster, toiling instead on the practice squad or injured reserve.My 78 percent number from 2009 is limited in its own ways, admittedly. I did not conduct the study myself, and, as I told Carlson, I wish I had access to all its component parts. But the statistic was vetted by multiple NFL and NFL Players Association sources who asked not to be quoted or only be quoted anonymously. Several of them shared with me that the stat had been presented at confidential meetings they attended. It was the last, best estimate anyone in this industry had seen; in the six years since SI published the article, neither the PR-obsessed NFL nor the Players Association has disputed the number’s validity in public.What the NFL did instead was eventually market its own study, published months after my SI article in 2009, with findings that were more pessimistic than the NBER working paper’s but more optimistic than the ones in my article. The league supplied University of Michigan researchers with an even more rarified sample of players: pension-eligible retirees, meaning those who had played a minimum of three years. The average career length among those interviewed was 7.3 seasons, far longer than the NFL average.4The NFL says the average length of a player’s career is six years, but that only counts players who make it onto a club’s opening-day roster in their rookie year. Several non-league sources estimate that the average for all players is closer to three or four years. “We had no way to include players with shorter careers,” one of the Michigan authors, David Weir, wrote to me in 2012, “and I would certainly agree that they would be an interesting group to know more about.” That same year, I received an email from an NFL PR person with the following results for me to chew on: “45% (age 50+) and 48% (age 30-49) of retired players said that they have at some point ‘experienced significant losses in business or financial investments.’”None of this was a direct comparison to the number cited in my article, not even close. But said PR person nevertheless included his own note, colored in bright red font: “a far cry from 78 percent.”The NFL has already convinced thousands of men to devote themselves to the pursuit of a lifestyle that is unsustainable at best and fictional at worst. Some of the enablers of this dream include, but are not limited to: the league’s financial literacy programs, which have historically failed to instill basic principles; the NFL Players Association’s certification program for financial advisers, which supposedly vetted a number of moneymen who reportedly allowed players to lose more than $300 million in recent years; and the players themselves, who are pressured to exaggerate the opulence of their existence.Even academics are susceptible. “I don’t think there’s really a problem with either of our numbers,” Carlson told me. “They’re really measuring different things.”That last sentence isn’t a great headline, no. But it’s 100 percent true. More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed Listen: Pablo Torre Discusses His Piece On Our Sports Podcast Seven years ago, I started reporting a piece for Sports Illustrated on the financial health of NFL players — a whole lot of them went broke soon after leaving the league. Ever since then, I’ve been seeking reliable statistics to help define the scope of a complicated problem. Just how many athletes emerge financially imperiled once their pro salaries dry up?And so my brain’s wonkiest pleasure centers lit up recently when an economist friend emailed me a PDF that bills itself as a new, “comprehensive” study of that very issue. What I wasn’t expecting was for the study — in the course of selling itself to the public — to train its sights on me.Presenting the National Bureau of Economic Research’s Working Paper No. 21085, “Bankruptcy Rates Among NFL Players with Short-Lived Income Spikes.” The researchers who put it together used Pro-Football-Reference.com to compile a list of 2,016 players who were drafted by NFL teams between 1996 and 2003. They then gave that list to a third-party service,1Since the working paper itself did not explain how the researchers managed to unearth addresses for 2,016 men whose homes and employers were scattered across the country, I asked one of the authors, Kyle Carlson of the California Institute of Technology, how they managed it. He is the one who provided me with this information. asking it to search for recorded addresses that matched those names, and had another service scan for bankruptcy filings that fit both the names and the addresses.The study’s big finding: Of the 471 draftees2This total was also provided to me by Carlson. who had been retired for at least 12 years, 74, or 15.7 percent, had filed for bankruptcy by year 12. By Pablo S. Torre read more

Football OSUs success motivated by enjoying the little things

The OSU football team and cheerleaders sing “Carmen” following the Buckeyes 62-3 win over Maryland on Nov. 12. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorThe No. 2 Ohio State Buckeyes were riding high until they ran into a roadblock at Penn State. OSU lost its first game of the season after multiple games that sprung criticism of the offensive play-calling. The defeat prompted OSU coach Urban Meyer to give an alarming opinion on where the team should be at the moment.“We’re not a great team right now,” Meyer said after the Penn State game. “We gotta come back and keep swinging.”Since then, OSU has been playing its best football of the season and is in the heart of the College Football Playoff picture. But the turnaround after Penn State wasn’t the easiest thing. Several players vocalized the importance of learning from the humbling experience. However, it’s one thing to say it, and it’s another thing to actually learn from the mistakes and apply those lessons.For OSU, it is the appreciation of the little things that has made a difference.“If you don’t appreciate the little things of life, those things go away,” said redshirt junior guard Billy Price. “You just have to appreciate winning around here. Wins in the Big Ten are hard; I mean really, really hard. So you have to appreciate every little thing.”Price and the rest of the offensive line were responsible for six sacks and 11 tackles for loss against Penn State. The unit gathered itself and returned to give redshirt junior quarterback J.T. Barrett the pocket he needed to make plays in the passing game. Barrett had arguably his two best games of the year against Nebraska and Maryland. Combined, he gained over 600 yards and has been responsible for eight touchdowns the past two weeks.On the defensive side of the football, redshirt junior defensive end Tyquan Lewis said that the Silver Bullets are also buying into the little things since the Penn State game. He said that the unit was already strong, but adversity brought them together. He added that the bond among the players is paramount in November.“I think we’re only guaranteed like 13 more days together. These seasons, they roll by and people move on,”  Lewis said. “You have to value that time and that bond with your brothers because you’ll never get it back.”The timing of three top-four teams losing and OSU hitting its peak production couldn’t be better. OSU’s offense scored 60 points in back-to-back games for the first time in 20 years. Ranked No. 2 in the College Football Playoff poll, OSU looks to be in a prime spot to make its second final four in three seasons.Michigan’s loss to Iowa on Saturday makes the path to the Big Ten Championship Game a bit complicated for OSU. If OSU and Penn State both win out, the Nittany Lions will represent the Big Ten East in Indianapolis on Dec. 3 by way of a head-to-head tiebreaker. Despite that, Barrett and redshirt sophomore defensive end Sam Hubbard voiced their opinions on the team’s CFP fate.They see it like this: OSU wins out, the Buckeyes are in.However, the team is focused on Michigan State. Following the Maryland game, Meyer made that apparent.“November is here and we got a big one coming one week from today,” he said. read more