Xin Yuan Ocean Orders Tanker from Compatriot Shipyard

first_imgzoom China-based shipowner Xin Yuan Ocean has opted to order a small dirty tanker, with an option for another vessel of the same kind, from a compatriot shipbuilder Fujian Mawei Shipbuilding.According to data provided by VesselsValue, the company placed the order for the new ship on June 7.The vessel in question will feature 7,500 dwt and is expected to join its owner in 2018, while its sister ship, if ordered, would be delivered in 2019.Although the financial details of the agreement were not disclosed, VesselsValue informed that the ships have a combined market value of around USD 22 million.Xin Yuan Ocean currently operates one small dirty tanker, the 8,000 dwt Rostella. Built by China’s Quingshan Shipyard, the vessel, which has a market value of USD 17.8 million, was delivered to the company in April 2017.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

Miss Teen TCI Malique Ferrette home now

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Massive 8.2 earthquake rocks Mexico and Guatemala; 32 people dead. Recommended for you Miss Teen TCI Contestants to be unveiled Related Items:guatemala, malique ferette, miss photogenic, miss teen Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 11 Feb 2015 – She is back! After a show stopping performance and representation at the Miss Teen Universe pageant in Guatemala City, Guatemala, Malique Ferrette is returned to Turks and Caicos yesterday. The Miss Teen TCI organization called it a series of unfortunate events which delayed Miss Ferrette getting back more quickly; a volcano erupted in Guatemala and forced the airport’s closure, grounding flights and making even next day connections home nearly impossible for the teen and the contingent, which included her mother. The first title holder for the country not only earned best face with the Miss Photogenic award at the Saturday night contest, but was dynamite in drama getting the longest time to put on her talent at the show – her focus on domestic violence. See photos of Malique at the Miss Teen TCI Facebook page; also on hand to greet Malique upon her return, Miss Universe Turks and Caicos, another stand out, Shanice Williams. Miss Teen TCI Malique lovely in Guatemala Citylast_img read more

Dear Virat Kohli dont blame media for speculating you and Rohit Sharma

first_imgVirat Kohli should have done more to dispel rumours of riftICCIn the press conference that Virat Kohli and Ravi Shastri addressed before embarking on the tour of West Indies, the Indian captain lashed out at the media for wildly speculating about a supposed rift between him and Rohit Sharma.”In my opinion, it’s baffling and ridiculous to read such stuff. Public talks about how well we’ve played, and here we’re feeding lies and talking about negative things. And I’ve seen this being brought up for far too long now. It’s bizarre how people are creating these things,” Kohli stated emphatically.Now, it is a fact that the Indian media can be overzealous in speculating about the cricket team and famous personalities. But in this case, the media is in no way responsible for fuelling the speculation. Let’s be clear, reports of rifts in cricket teams, especially Indian cricket teams are a common phenomenon. From the supposed estrangement between Kapil Dev and Sunil Gavaskar in the 1980s to the problems MS Dhoni had with Virender Sehwag and Gautam Gambhir, such instances and their reporting are nothing new. Both men have not even posted a photo together despite being together in West IndiesGetty Images/ICCSo, Kohli cannot claim that he is being subjected to unprecedented scrutiny. The same media which builds up stars like him has the right to also ask questions which may not be flattering. But what makes the Indian captain’s anger all the more surprising is the fact that it is his and Rohit Sharma’s actions, or the lack of it, that has led the rumours become so widespread.Till that particular press conference, both men, and the BCCI refused to utter a single word regarding this issue. If Kohli finds these speculations in the media ‘baffling’ and ‘ridiculous,’ what stopped him from issuing a small statement or just posting a message on Twitter.Besides, some of the biggest stories on this issue has come through comments by highly-placed sources within the BCCI as well as an unnamed member of CoA. With a storm brewing in the media, was it not incumbent on the two players to put out just one sentence negating these reports, if indeed they were incorrect. The social media activities of the two players have also added fuel to the rumoursInstagramWhile Kohli lashed out at the media in the pre-tour press meet, Rohit has remained silent. Despite being together in the squad in West Indies, the two men haven’t even posted a photo together which can be the strongest proof of their being no resentment between them. This is a very strong clue of the reports of this dissension being very much true.Lastly, media-persons would remember what happened in 2017. There were stories in the media in the middle of that year suggesting problems between Kohli and the then coach Anil Kumble. At that time also, Virat had categorically rejected these reports, only for them to be proved right. So, media is perfectly justified in speculating.Till now, not a word has been heard from the side of Rohit and a picture that Virat tweeted of his team didn’t include him. If this doesn’t make people suspect, what will?last_img read more

Two drug traders found dead in two districts

first_imgProthom Alo IllustrationPolice recovered the bodies of two suspected drug traders in Alamdanga upazila of Chuadanga and Tangail sadar upazila on Saturday, reports UNB.In Chuadanga, police recovered the body of a suspected drug trader from Satkopat area in Alamdanga upazila on Saturday morning.The deceased Oltu Mandal, 27, son of Mohasin Ali, a resident of Gobindapur village and accused in 12 drug cases.Abu Zihad Fakhrul Alam Khan, officer-in-charge of Alamdanga police station, said locals spotted the bullet-ridden body of Oltu around 10:00am and informed police.Later, police recovered the body and sent it to Chuadanga Sadar Hospital for an autopsy.Police said Oltu might have been killed following an enmity over sharing of money earned through drug business.Meanwhile, in Tangail, police recovered the bullet hit body of an alleged drug paddler from a playground in Charaberibandh area of Sadar upazila.The deceased Abdul Mannan, 45, is son of Ali Hossain of Kandapara area in Tangail Municipality area.Sayedur Rahman, officer-in-charge of Tangail Model Police Station, said Mannan was killed in a gunfight between two gangs of drug traders around 3:30am at Charaberibandh area.Later, in the morning police recovered the body, he said.Police also recovered a pistol, three shells and 200 pieces of yaba pills from the spot, he added.Mannan, a well-known yaba trader, was wanted in six drug related cases filed with Sadar Model Police Station, he added.Sanjit Kumar Roy, Superintendent of Tangail Police, said Mannan was killed in a factional clash.With the latest one, at least 117 people were killed in ‘gunfights’ with members of law enforcement agencies while 39 bodies of suspected drug traders were recovered after reported gun battles between rival groups during the countrywide anti-narcotic drives since 15 May.last_img read more

Physics team suggests possible way to make quantum cryptography available in handheld

first_img Being able to encrypt data and the key that allows for unlocking it has become important in modern life. Companies spend millions attempting to protect sensitive information while hackers work non-stop trying to overcome such hurdles to access that information. The current system (RSA) is believed to be, at least for now, just ahead of the hackers. It relies on public key encryption of plain text and privately encrypted keys. This system has two weak points. The first is that it assumes that a hacker has not been able to gain access to a private key through nonconventional means and the second is that it’s based on mathematical algorithms that can be cracked given fast enough computers. To gain the upper hand, cryptologists have turned to quantum key distribution (QKD), where quantum bits are used to represent private keys. The main advantage here is that according to the laws of physics, it should be impossible for a hacker to use the key without their interception being detected, which would prevent the sensitive data from being sent.Up till now, the main hindrance to using QKD has been that it requires a lot of heavy duty equipment and a straight line mode of transport between the sender and receiver due to its sensitivity to noise. In their paper, the team from Bristol claim to have come up with a scheme that should allow a way to overcome such restrictions, at least on the receiver side. It’s based on what they call a reference frame independent QKD protocol for polarization of qubits in polarization maintaining fiber—which in essence means they use math (based on measurements made in random directions) to describe a way for moving photons through fiber cables without disturbing their polarizationThe team has not yet built such a device of course, that will need to be done by applied physicists, engineers and computer professionals—thus it’s not yet a certainty that such a device will work as imagined. One sticking point in particular might be whether the real-world system is actually able to overcome the inherent noise sensitivity. (Phys.org) —A team of physicists at Bristol University in the U.K. has proposed a possible way to allow for quantum cryptography between a large station and a small hand held device. They describe such a technique in a paper they have uploaded to the preprint server arXiv. © 2013 Phys.org Experimental set-up for client-server rfiQKD. The server side holds a telecom wavelength (1550 nm) laser with a 1 MHz pulse generator (PG) and fixed polariser, to send light pulses to the client through a polarisation maintaining fibre (PMF). At the client side, an integrated polarisation controller (PC) encodes qubits into the polarisation of the attenuated (Att.) light. A fibre beam splitter (FBS) and photodetector (PD) continuously monitor power for malicious attacks. Qubits received back at the server side are measured with a similar PC, fibre polarising beamsplitter (FPBS), and superconducting single photon detectors (SSPDs), all controlled by an electronic board synchronisation (Sync.), function programmable gate array (FPGA), and processor. The Bloch sphere illustrates the effects of an unstable environment on polarisation. Credit: arXiv:1308.3436 [quant-ph] Explore further More information: Reference frame independent quantum key distribution server with telecom tether for on-chip client, arXiv:1308.3436 [quant-ph] arxiv.org/abs/1308.3436AbstractWe demonstrate a client-server quantum key distribution (QKD) scheme, with large resources such as laser and detectors situated at the server-side, which is accessible via telecom-fibre, to a client requiring only an on-chip polarisation rotator, that may be integrated into a handheld device. The detrimental effects of unstable fibre birefringence are overcome by employing the reference frame independent QKD protocol for polarisation qubits in polarisation maintaining fibre, where standard QKD protocols fail, as we show for comparison. This opens the way for quantum enhanced secure communications between companies and members of the general public equipped with handheld mobile devices, via telecom-fibre tethering.via Arxiv Blogcenter_img Citation: Physics team suggests possible way to make quantum cryptography available in handheld machines (2013, August 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-08-physics-team-quantum-cryptography-handheld.html Journal information: arXiv This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Engineers achieve first airplane to ground quantum key distribution exchangelast_img read more