James Cromwell Arrested During Cat Abuse Protest

first_imgAcademy Award nominee and longtime PETA activist James Cromwell was arrested Thursday morning after interrupting a University of Wisconsin (UW) Board of Regents meeting to demand an end to cruel and deadly brain experiments on scores of cats at UW-Madison.Shouting “Shame on UW for mutilating and killing cats!” and holding graphic blown-up photos showing how UW drilled into, deafened, and decapitated a cat named Double Trouble, Cromwell and PETA supporters were surrounded by university police and taken out of the building. Video of the event will be available shortly.“The University of Wisconsin may think that grant money matters more than animals’ suffering, but the public who unwittingly funds this cruelty demands an end to these hideous experiments,” says Cromwell. “My friends at PETA and I will continue to call on UW-Madison to stop cutting into and killing cats in this useless experiment.”Thursday’s protest follows a January 22 letter sent by PETA to the UW Board of Regents describing the abuse of nine other cats in the same laboratory where Double Trouble was experimented on and killed, as documented by UW’s own records. PETA asked the regents for an immediate end to the cruel experiments but received no response.Double Trouble and other cats developed bacterial infections from the traumatic head and eye wounds inflicted on them, were starved for days at a time, and had their heads mutilated and stainless-steel posts screwed to their skulls. They were deafened and forced to work for small bits of food. Double Trouble was killed and decapitated. Some of the other cats may still be alive in a UW laboratory.More than $3 million in federal funds from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have been wasted on this ongoing project, even though leading clinicians in the field have never cited the published study as contributing to improving human hearing. More than 200,000 people have used PETA’s website to ask the NIH to cut funding for these experiments.For more information, please visit PETA.org/DoubleTrouble.Source:PETAlast_img read more

TV Personality Lainey Lui Joins World Animal Protection campaign to save dogs

first_imgTV Personality Lainey Lui Joins World Animal Protection campaign to save millions of dogs around the world. (CNW Group/World Animal Protection) Facebook Twitter Advertisement Advertisement TORONTO, Sept. 25, 2017 /CNW/ – Global charity World Animal Protection marked a major milestone last year, with one million rabies vaccinations delivered as part of its Better Lives for Dogs campaign. This year, just in time for World Rabies Day (September 28), the organization has announced a new campaign ambassador and expansion of the international vaccination program to Sierra Leone.With only four active vets in the entire country and an overwhelming population of stray dogs, the animal welfare situation in Sierra Leone is very serious.“In Freetown, Sierra Leone, we estimate there to be approximately 100,000 stray dogs,” said Josey Kitson, Executive Director at World Animal Protection Canada.  “The potential for rabies exposure and other conflicts with stray dogs is a real and daily fear for people. Tragically, authorities sometimes opt to kill the dogs in an attempt to safeguard their communities but we know vaccination is the only way. World Animal Protection is working towards humane solutions to the issues that cause fear, misunderstanding and a divide between a community and their dogs by providing free rabies vaccinations and education on the ground.”center_img The misguided killing is not specific to Sierra Leone, however. There are 700 million dogs in the world today and many of them are free roaming, unwanted, unhealthy and unvaccinated. Fear of bites and rabies mean that millions are killed every year.World Animal Protection has been leading the way to stop these unnecessary killings. Working with local governments, the global charity has performed more than one million vaccinations of dogs in Kenya, Zanzibar, China, Indonesia, the Philippines and Bangladesh.Many high-profile Canadians have been supporting the campaign and its work by using their voice to raise awareness of the campaign and highlight the need for action to protect dogs around the globe. This year, a new champion has joined the cause: Elaine “Lainey” Lui, Co-host of CTV’s THE SOCIAL, ETALK Senior Correspondent, and Founder/Editor of top Canadian entertainment website LaineyGossip.com, is the latest dog lover to speak out in support of Better Lives for Dogs.“I’m so honoured to be a part of World Animal Protection’s ambassador roster,” said Elaine Lui. “My dogs Barney and Elvis are part of my family, and I can’t imagine life without them. It’s unbelievable to think millions of dogs lose their lives over something as preventable as rabies and fear. Through education, vaccination and grassroots community engagement, dogs around the world can lead healthier, happier lives and bring joy to those around them – just like our own pets do.”All dogs deserve to live without fear and suffering, and we can all help by supporting responsible dog ownership and vaccination. World Animal Protection’s goal is to improve the lives of 50 million dogs by 2020.  Visit www.worldanimalprotection.ca to find out more.About World Animal Protection:For more than 50 years and in more than 50 countries, World Animal Protection has been preventing animal cruelty and inspiring people to change animals’ lives for the better. Today we’re working on projects with local partners, governments and businesses to find practical ways to prevent animal suffering worldwide.  We also collaborate with the UN and other international bodies to make sure animals are on the global agenda because animal protection is a fundamental part of a sustainable future. Login/Register With: Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more