Cancer cases spike in northern community

first_imgAPTN National NewsFort Good Hope, in the Northwest Territories, is seeing a spike in the number of cancer cases in their community. Over the last six months, eight new cases have been diagnosed. And that’s big news for a small town of 600.APTN National News reporter Cullen Crozier visits Fort Good Hope to talk about what could have caused it, and what happens next.last_img

AFN Chief Atleo blasts Ottawas environmental review plans in letter to Oliver

first_imgBy Jorge BarreraAPTN National NewsOTTAWA–The head of Canada’s largest and most influential First Nations organization is demanding Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver meet with chiefs before implementing the Conservative government’s “unlawful and unconstitutional” planned changes to the environmental reviews of industrial projects.In a strongly worded letter to Oliver, Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo says Ottawa’s plan to streamline environmental reviews runs afoul of Canada’s duty to consult First Nations on projects and legislative changes that impact Aboriginal and Treaty rights.Atleo’s letter comes mere months after January’s Crown-First Nations gathering in Ottawa where Prime Minister Stephen Harper proclaimed ushered in a “new day” in Canada’s relationship with Indigenous people.At stake but not mentioned in Atleo’s letter is Enbridge’s massive Northern Gateway Pipeline project which is broadly opposed by First Nations. The project, however, is backed by the Conservative government which says piping Alberta bitumen to the British Columbia coast to satiate China’s oil-thirsty economic machinery is in Canada’s national interest.“Thirty years after the Constitution recognized and affirmed Aboriginal and Treaty rights, it is an alarming development that Canada would take such steps that will potentially further undermine processes that already do not adequately address clear duties for consultation and accommodation,” wrote Atleo, in the letter, dated the April 20, 2012. “We encourage Canada to immediately engage with First Nations to address this uncertainty, to confirm the constitutional duty and being in earnest creating processes that uphold the honour of the Crown.”The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled repeatedly that the Canadian government has a duty to consult with First Nations on legislation and industrial projects that impact their territory, culture, Aboriginal and treaty rights.“It is abundantly clear that the Crown is bound by the Constitution to uphold its duty to consult and accommodate the Aboriginal and Treaty rights of First Nations, which means it cannot unilaterally reduce these duties through changes to existing legislation,” wrote Atleo in the letter, obtained by APTN National News.The Conservative government announced in its latest federal budget that it would be introducing legislation to streamline the environment review process for industrial projects, setting hard timelines for approvals and turning over responsibility for some reviews to the provinces. The planned changes are geared toward ensuring approval of Enbridge’s multi-billion dollar pipeline, according to many analysts.As part of the package, the Conservatives also plan to streamline consultations with First Nations, assigning one Crown agency to deal with consultation on each project. The government plans to integrating consultation into environmental reviews and announced it was contributing about $13 million toward this initiative.Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver, whose department announced the changes to “Aboriginal consultations” and has taken the lead publicly on the file, now says it is up to Aboriginal Minister John Duncan to deal with the issue.“I am not the one primarily responsible, it is obviously my colleague (Aboriginal Affairs Minister) John Duncan,” said Oliver, Wednesday. “I think (Duncan) has been working very hard to deeper the consultation and this legislation will do that.”Oliver said he hadn’t read Atleo’s letter, but tried and failed to reach the national chief to discuss the issue.“Consultation is absolutely fundamental to our obligation. We have been consulting, we will continue to consult,” said Oliver. “We want to bring the communities in earlier in the process with respect to each project and ensure consultation is more meaningful.”Atleo’s letter, however, listed a number of areas where the Conservative government ignored the rights of First Nations, including in plans to integrate Aboriginal consultation into the environmental approval process.“Integration of Aboriginal consultations fails to recognize the distinct legal rights of First Nations and the differential impacts that may be experienced by different Aboriginal groups,” wrote Atleo.Atleo wrote that the Conservative government’s plan to give the National Energy Board the ability to approve projects even before initiating consultation with First Nations is causing serious concern.“Such a practice would constitute a breach of the federal duty (to consult), would be an affront to First Nations who will be impacted by such decisions and ultimately would be unlawful and unconstitutional,” wrote Atleo.The Conservative’s promised $13 million to improve Aboriginal consultations would do little more than create more bureaucracy, according to Atleo.“We have since learned that this funding may in fact in large part be dedicated to increasing Canada’s capacity to manage consultations and not be available directly to First Nations,” he wrote.Atleo’s letter also criticized the government’s planned changes to the Fisheries Act, which would reduce the number of instances requiring Ottawa to intervene on projects that impact fish habitat.“Proposed changes announce as part of the plan may indeed have broad impacts on drinking water, fish habitat and environmental health and may reduce the ability to restrict on-reserve activity related to water,” wrote Atleo.The stakes are too high for Ottawa to ignore the positions of First Nations anymore, wrote Atleo.“These are critical matters to the survival, rights and interests of First Nations and are lawful obligations that must not and cannot be denied,” he wrote.Duncan’s office could not immediatly provide comment.jbarrera@aptn.calast_img read more

Mikmaq chief welcomes shipyard jobs

first_imgAPTN National NewsWith the announcement of four jobs Thursday for the Mi’kmaq there’s hope more are on the way at shipyards in Halifax.There have been nearly 3,000 jobs as a result of a $25 billion contract awarded to Irving.Only  a handful of those are Mi’kmaq.Still, one chief says Thursday’s announcement is a step in the right direction.last_img

100 Tribes come unite against pipeline near Standing Rock in North Dakota

first_imgDennis WardAPTN National NewsMore than 100 tribes have come together near Standing Rock in North Dakota.They’re uniting at the Sacred Stone camp to try and stop construction of the Dakota Access pipeline project.It will carry oil through four states including North Dakota.Right in the middle of the Sacred Stone camp is a council lodge‎ that has a lot of people talking.last_img

Quebec to hire Indigenous police officers in Val dOr as a pilot

first_imgDanielle Rochette APTN National NewsSupport for the Indigenous women in Val d’Or continues to grow.Last week, Crown prosecutors said no officers in the Quebec town will face charges after women came forward alleging sexual abuse.The province just announced a new pilot project that will see Indigenous officers stationed in Val d’Or.That hasn’t quieted calls for an inquiry.last_img

Food company chairman gets 2 years in prison in fraud case

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – A former food company executive who admitted feeding inside information to an influential Las Vegas gambler linked to golfer Phil Mickelson was sentenced on Thursday to two years in prison by a judge who said he was motivated by a desire to seem powerful rather than by greed.“This was a crime that enhanced his status as a peacock,” U.S. District Judge P. Kevin Castel said, ordering Dallas-based Dean Foods Co.’s ex-chairman Thomas Davis to pay nearly $9 million in restitution and to forfeit nearly $1 million for a conspiracy that ran from at least 2008 through 2014.The judge said Davis, 68, “paraded through Dallas as a peacock … when he was a phoney, a fraud and a crook.”“This was not a crime of greed,” the judge said, adding, “It’s a real shame.”Davis had a good upbringing and served in the U.S. Navy before attending Harvard Business School, the judge noted. Afterward, Davis earned more than $1 million annually before getting $10 million when the investment bank where he worked was bought.The judge acknowledged Davis was a pivotal co-operator who testified at trial against gambler William “Billy” Walters. Mickelson had to repay $1 million in stock profits after receiving a tip from Walters but wasn’t charged.Walters was convicted last spring of making more than $40 million through illegal trading and was sentenced to five years in prison. His lawyer said the prosecution hung on a witness’ lies.The judge criticized Davis for lying to the Securities and Exchange Commission and going on a $10,000 gambling junket just days after pleading guilty even though he knew he would owe restitution and a forfeiture amount at sentencing. Davis, who must surrender on Jan. 9, apologized.The judge also criticized Davis for misappropriating $100,000 in 2011 from a Dallas-based charity he oversaw to cover gambling debts he accumulated during a trip to a Las Vegas casino.Prosecutors said in court papers the thrice-married Davis had lived a lavish lifestyle that included luxury travel, fancy cars, membership in private clubs and gambling trips on which he spent tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of dollars.Davis spent so much money that he eventually sought and obtained from Walters two loans totalling more than $800,000, which were “essentially forgiven” in return for the inside information he regularly provided to Walters, prosecutors said.The government also said Davis made revelations from the witness stand that prosecutors had not heard before, including the frequency with which he used escort services.Assistant U.S. Attorney Brooke Cucinella told the judge that Davis was a “committed” co-operator who provided information that was “incredibly devastating at trial.”Defence attorney Benjamin Naftalis called his client’s co-operation “extraordinary and crucial.”“He was the key and star witness of the trial,” he said.Davis, addressing the judge, said he was a changed man and was “grateful for my newfound humility.”last_img read more

Tribe rejects plan to build tram hotel in Grand Canyon

first_imgLegislation to build an aerial tram to take paying visitors to a riverside boardwalk in the Grand Canyon has been voted down by the Navajo Nation Council.Members of the council voted 16-2 against the bill during a special session Tuesday in Window Rock, Arizona. It was the first time the full council had taken up the measure since it was introduced last year.The proposal had gotten a cold reception from lawmakers from the nation’s largest American Indian reservation even before Tuesday’s lengthy debate.Some lawmakers raised concerns about the development resulting in more public safety demands, while others questioned a requirement for the tribe to invest $65 million for roads, water and power lines, and communications at the 420-acre site that borders Grand Canyon National Park on the reservation.Council delegates amended the legislation to change the operating license from non-revocable to revocable, to delete language to prevent other development within a 15-mile radius and along access roads, and to strike a non-taxation provision before voting on the bill. The amendments didn’t convince them the project should move forward.Developers had said the tram and accompanying retail and hotel sites at the East Rim could be running by May 2021 had everything gone as planned. They did not immediately return phone messages seeking comment after the vote.Critics showed up to urge lawmakers to oppose the project as the debate finally got under way late Tuesday afternoon. Those included families who hold grazing permits and leases to build homes in the area.They have said the area is sacred and the proposed development would mar the landscape where the Colorado River meets the blue-green waters of the Little Colorado River.Declaring victory over what they termed a “monster,” they praised the council’s vote on social media and let out loud cheers outside the council chambers.“They heard us,” activist Renae Yellowhorse said of the council members. “We needed to be a presence there to let them know we’re not going to go away. We’re going to always be here to defend our Mother, to defend our sacred sites.”Environmentalists and outdoor enthusiasts also decried the measure. Actor Robert Redford released a video last December voicing opposition, and an online petition against the proposal has collected thousands of signatures.The vote came ahead of a tribal election year and as the tribe prepares for the loss of hundreds of jobs with the expected shutdown of a coal-fired power plant and its supply mine in 2019.Lamar Whitmer, part of the Scottsdale-based Confluence Partners development group, previously said the East Rim project could employ up to 3,500 people on a reservation where half the workforce is unemployed.The management team includes former Navajo President Albert Hale and others who have helped develop resorts and theme parks.Under the legislation, the Navajo Nation’s share of revenue was based on the number of visitors. The tribe would have been guaranteed a minimum 8 per cent of gross revenue, developers say.___Associated Press writer Susan Montoya Bryan in Albuquerque, New Mexico, contributed to this reportlast_img read more

Business of Tech IT transformation and cloudbased SOCAN tracking

first_imgThe Business of Tech is a weekly, ‘byte’-sized look into some of the top business stories in the world of technology, hosted by 660’s Jonathan Muma.S1E14: This week, Jonathan speaks with Senior VP of Global Solutions Marketing at Dell EMC Guarav Chand about the pitfalls and benefits of IT transformation. He also speaks with SOCAN’s Kit Wheeler about a new cloud-based tracking tool which has made its way into clubs and events.Audio Playerhttps://www.660news.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/sites/8/2017/11/22/business-of-tech-nov-17-s1e14.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.last_img read more

QA How is the growth of bitcoin affecting the environment

first_imgThe growth of bitcoin is fueling speculation and debate about the environmental impact of the collective energy needed to power the virtual currency in the era of climate change. Some questions and answers about the issue:___WHAT IS BITCOIN?Bitcoin is the most popular virtual currency in the world, and it has grown in value this year. It was created in 2009 as a new way of paying for things that would not be subject to central banks that are capable of devaluing currency. The sustainability concerns about bitcoin, voiced by economists and environmentalists, stem from the process of “mining” that is central to its existence.The “miners” use computers to make complex calculations that verify transactions in bitcoins. This uses a tremendous amount of energy via computers and server farms all over the world, which has given rise to concerns about the amount of fossil fuel-dependent electricity used to power the computers. Some estimates say bitcoin’s energy impact is more than that of a small country.___WHY IS BITCOIN ATTRACTIVE?Bitcoin is a kind of digital money that isn’t tied to a bank or a government, and its value has risen swiftly in the second half of 2017. The value of one bitcoin was about $16,500, in late December, compared with about $1,000 in March. The price is also volatile, though, and tailed off somewhat after coming close to $20,000 earlier in December. A bitcoin itself is essentially a line of computer code. It’s signed digitally when it goes from one owner to another.___WHY ARE CRITICS CONCERNED ABOUT BITCOIN ENERGY USE?Bitcoin can’t exist without computers, which can’t exist without a source of electricity. And the number of computers and the energy needed to power them is rising.The growing value of bitcoin is directly tied to the amount of energy it uses. The miners unlock bitcoins by solving complex, unique puzzles. As the value of bitcoin goes up, the puzzles become increasingly more difficult, and it requires more computer power to solve them.Some estimates say more than 60 per cent of the processing power used to mine bitcoin is in China, where it relies heavily on the burning of coal. Coal and other fossil fuels are also the largest generator of electricity for the rest of the world, and coal is a significant contributor to manmade climate change. Burning it produces carbon dioxide, a gas that is a primary contributor to global warming.This reliance on fossil fuels has given rise to speculation that bitcoin’s energy consumption will continue to rise as it grows in popularity. Glen Brand, director of a Sierra Club chapter in Maine, said in an interview that the growth of virtual currencies such as bitcoin “threatens progress we are making toward moving toward a low energy, low carbon economy.”___HOW MUCH DOES BITCOIN REALLY AFFECT ENERGY CONSUMPTION?Estimates vary, and a true figure could be impossible to come by because of the intentionally anonymous nature of bitcoin use. But Dutch bitcoin analyst Alex de Vries, who operates a Bitcoin Energy Consumption Index on the website Digiconomist, has produced estimates he believes are alarming.If bitcoin miners are using the most efficient machines possible, the lowest amount of electricity they could possibly be using is 13 terawatt hours, de Vries said in an interview. That’s about as much as the entire country of Slovenia. De Vries said less conservative estimates make it entirely possible that bitcoin is using as much energy as Ireland, which consumes about twice as much as Slovenia, or about 0.7 per cent of the U.S. total.The problem is getting worse, said de Vries, who estimated the annual amount of energy consumed by bitcoin rose by a fifth in the final weeks of 2017.___WHO IS RIGHT IN THE BITCOIN DEBATE?The extent of bitcoin’s impact on the environment, and how much that should matter to people who use it, is a source of debate.While de Vries says bitcoin is consuming an “insane amount of energy,” both on its own and relative to older payment systems such as credit cards, others think the situation is now so dire.Bitcoin investor Marc Bevand, of St. Louis, has written that bitcoin likely uses close to four or five terawatt hours, less than the annual electricity consumption for Christmas lights in the U.S. He said that he believes bitcoin’s benefits, such as making payments more efficient and helping people escape inflation, outweigh the environmental toll. However, he added: “We don’t have exact data to say how much we are benefiting from bitcoin.”last_img read more

Growing rail transport expected to bolster oil prices for Canadian producers

first_imgCALGARY – Steep discounts in prices for western Canadian heavy oil are moderating and should gradually ease through 2018 to allow Canadian producers to reap bigger rewards from strengthening world oil prices, according to GMP FirstEnergy.A spike in the difference between Western Canadian Select crude prices and benchmark U.S. prices was made worse by volume constraints on the Keystone pipeline system between Alberta and the U.S. Gulf Coast following a leak in South Dakota in November, said analyst Martin King in a presentation in Calgary on Tuesday.He said the transportation blockage meant growing volumes from Alberta’s oilsands couldn’t easily get to market, driving prices lower for the bitumen blend at the same time that New York-traded West Texas Intermediate was climbing to three-year highs above US$64 per barrel.King said crude-by-rail terminals in Western Canada have been using a small part of their one million barrels per day of capacity but are now activating idle capacity to fill the gap, with the main constraints being availability of locomotives and conductors.“Over the next couple of years, I could see a lot of that capacity being used up for railing, hopefully just in time for new pipelines to come into service in 2020,” he said.“I think those differentials will (shrink) another US$5 to US$7.”He predicted the Canadian crude discount will fall from US$17.30 per barrel in the fourth quarter of 2017 to average US$16 in the current quarter and US$13 in the third quarter of this year.Rail transport is more expensive than pipeline but the shipper has the advantage of sending his crude to the market where it will fetch the best price.On Tuesday, Calgary intermediate producer Obsidian Energy Ltd. (TSX:OBE) announced that it will begin shipping some of its northwestern Alberta heavy oil by rail in the next few weeks to try to get better prices.It estimated that rail transport will cut the price discount it is receiving by about half.In a report on Monday, ATB Financial said Western Canadian Select has averaged about US$36 per barrel so far this year, about 11 per cent lower than in the last three months of 2017.It also concluded that growing use of crude-by-rail will help ease the price discount towards the end of the first quarter of 2018.In its latest report, the National Energy Board said crude-by-rail exports from Canada rose to above 136,000 barrels per day in October, about one-third higher than in the same month of 2016.Follow @HealingSlowly on Twitter.last_img read more

Pipeline fight continues federal decision does not reduce spill risk Horgan

first_imgVICTORIA – Premier John Horgan says he will continue the fight to protect British Columbia’s coast from the consequences of an oil spill regardless of who owns the Trans Mountain pipeline.The federal government’s decision to take over the pipeline from Kinder Morgan doesn’t change his government’s position to oppose the expansion project from Edmonton to Burnaby or its decision last month to pursue a reference case to the B.C. Court of Appeal, Horgan said Tuesday.“I believe we have an obligation to ensure that we are doing everything we can to avoid the catastrophic consequences of a diluted bitumen spill,” he said.Horgan said Ottawa’s decision to buy the pipeline does not reduce the risk to B.C.’s environment and economy, which is why the province is asking the court whether it has jurisdiction to protect itself from a spill. The fact the pipeline is about to be owned by a federal Crown corporation doesn’t affect the reference case, he added.But the federal government’s decision to take over the project puts Ottawa in charge of managing the pipeline, including its risks, Horgan said.“I do believe the federal government now is totally accountable, not just for regulation and approval of a pipeline, but they now are responsible from wellhead to tidewater and beyond,” he said. “That allows us now to have more candid discussions with the owners of the pipeline than I would have been able to when they were shareholders in a Texas-based oil company.”B.C.’s Opposition Liberals said Horgan is about to be given the cold shoulder by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government.“This is a bad day for B.C. because John Horgan has decided to kick the feds in the shins,” Liberal Leader Andrew Wilkinson said. “This is a government that is creating investor chaos here in B.C.”Political experts said relations between B.C. and the federal government and neighbouring Alberta are strained over the ongoing pipeline dispute, but Trudeau’s Liberals have the most to lose with the pipeline purchase.The move could backfire politically in B.C., where the federal Liberals hold 14 seats, and globally on the environmental stage because the government has committed to fight climate change but has chosen to buy a pipeline, said Prof. Kathryn Harrison, an expert on federal-provincial relations at the University of British Columbia.“By repeatedly saying the pipeline will be built, prime minister Trudeau has painted himself into a corner where this was the last and only option,” she said in an interview.Prof. David Tindall, an expert on climate change politics at UBC, said Horgan has gained support in B.C. for his calm and focused approach to the pipeline debate.“He’s really emphasized the issue of trying to avoid oil spills and protecting the coast,” he said. “That’s one set of environmental issues, I think, that has broad support.”Horgan also gained support by not appearing as an environmental ideologue through his comments that endorse oil refineries over pipelines and his backing of liquefied natural gas projects, said Tindall.The federal decision to buy the pipeline could prompt further legal challenges by Indigenous Peoples, said Prof. Margot Young, a constitutional law and Indigenous legal rights expert at the University of British Columbia’s Peter A. Allard School of Law.“What is clear is that local and Indigenous opposition to the project can only be inflamed by this federal move,” she said. “And that opposition is independent of any constitutional decision reached by the courts.”(Companies in this story: TSX:KML)last_img read more

Attempt to break into Democratic Party voter data thwarted

first_imgCHICAGO – An attempt to break into the Democratic National Committee’s massive voter database has been thwarted, a party official said Wednesday, two years after Russian operatives sent the party into disarray by hacking into its computers and facilitating the release of tens of thousands of emails amid the presidential election.A web security firm using artificial intelligence uncovered the attempt. The DNC was notified Tuesday, it said. Hackers had created a fake login page to gather usernames and passwords in an effort to gain access to the Democratic Party’s voter file, a party official said. The file contains information on tens of millions of voters. The attempt was quickly thwarted by suspending the attacker’s account, and no information was compromised, the official said. The FBI was notified.The official wasn’t authorized to speak about sensitive security information and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.Government and tech officials say it’s too early to know who was behind the attempt. The FBI declined to comment to the AP.The attempt comes as Democrats gather for their summer meeting. The party’s cybersecurity has been an issue since the 2016 presidential election, when Russian hackers compromised DNC servers and publicly revealed internal communications that exploited divisions between Bernie Sanders’ and Hillary Clinton’s campaigns as the two candidates vied for the Democratic presidential nomination. Hackers also accessed the email accounts of Clinton’s campaign chairman, John Podesta, and systematically released the contents throughout the fall campaign.It also comes a day after Microsoft announced it had uncovered similarly fraudulent websites created by Kremlin agents that spoofed two conservative outfits that are foes of Russia’s president, Vladimir Putin, presumably to trick unwitting visitors into surrendering credentials.Bob Lord, the DNC’s chief security officer, said the attempt showed how serious the cyberthreat is and why it’s critical that state and federal officials work together on security.“This attempt is further proof that there are constant threats as we head into midterm elections and we must remain vigilant in order to prevent future attacks,” Lord said in a statement.He said President Donald Trump isn’t doing enough to protect American democracy. Previously, Trump mocked the DNC’s cybersecurity and cast doubt on U.S. intelligence officials’ findings that Russia was involved.At a previously scheduled election security briefing Wednesday, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said the quick response to the attempted DNC hack showed that the system was working “and that different entities understand who to reach out to,” she said.“Any attack on a political party or a campaign is important for us all to take seriously,” she said, emphasizing the government was doing all it could to help protect election systems ahead of the midterm elections. At stake is control of Congress, which could potentially switch from Republican to Democrat.Amid the news, a Senate committee abruptly postponed a Wednesday vote on legislation to help states prevent against election hacking, frustrating Democrats and at least one Republican on the panel.The vote was put off by the Senate Rules and Administration Committee after a bipartisan group of lawmakers spent months negotiating the legislation. The bill would aim to protect state election infrastructure by requiring that all states use backup paper ballots and conduct audits after elections, among other measures. It would also require DHS to immediately notify states if the federal government is aware that a state election system has been breached.A Senate Republican aide said the vote was postponed because secretaries of state had complained about certain provisions, including the type of audits the bill would require. The aide said additional Republican support would be necessary to move the legislation out of committee. The aide was not authorized to speak about the committee’s reasoning and spoke on condition of anonymity.Republican Sen. James Lankford of Oklahoma, one of the bill’s sponsors, said after the vote’s postponement: “Congressional inaction is unacceptable.”The bill “will help states take necessary steps to further prepare our election infrastructure for the possibility of interference from not just Russia, but other possible adversaries like Iran or North Korea or a hacktivist group,” Lankford said.The DNC committee attempt wasn’t mentioned at a Senate hearing on election security Wednesday, according to senators who were present.States have been scrambling to secure their election systems since it was revealed that Russian hackers targeted election systems in at least 21 states in 2016, though the number is likely greater. There has been no indication any vote tallies were changed. Nielsen said at the briefing that states should have auditing systems in part as a safeguard so the public knows the vote tallies can be trusted.In Tuesday’s incident, a scanning tool deployed by the San Francisco security company Lookout detected a masquerading website designed to harvest the passwords of users of the login page of NGP VAN, a technology provider used by the Democrats and other liberal-leaning political organizations, said Mike Murray, the company’s vice-president of security intelligence. He said he contacted the DNC.The tool, which leverages artificial intelligence, has been in development for a year and wasn’t tasked to scan any sites in particular but instead to identify phishing sites based on typical attributes, Murray said.“This is the beauty of AI: It finds things that humans don’t know to look for,” he said.He said the tool notified Lookout before the impostor page had even been populated with content. “As soon as we realized how fast it was developing, I decided to reach out to contacts that I know at the DNC.” Murray also contacted the website hosting company, Digital Ocean.Ross Rustici, senior director for intelligence services at Cybereason in Boston, said a voter database is a juicy target for anyone trying to exacerbate political divisions in the U.S. or gain insight on political opponents.“The data housed in these types of databases would be incredibly useful both for domestic opposition research as well as for foreign intelligence and counterintelligence purposes,” he said.___Long reported from Washington. Associated Press writers Mary Clare Jalonick in Washington, Frank Bajak in Boston and Mike Balsamo in Los Angeles contributed to this report.last_img read more

Paris police bracing for more violent protests

first_imgPARIS — Anticipating a fifth straight weekend of violent protests, Paris’ police chief says armoured vehicles and thousands of officers will be deployed again in the French capital on Saturday.Michel Delpuech told RTL radio on Friday security services intend to deploy the same numbers and strength as last weekend, with about 8,000 officers and 14 armoured vehicles again in Paris.Delpuech said the biggest difference will be the deployment of more groups of patrol officers to catch vandals who roamed streets around the Champs Elysees last weekend, causing damage and pillaging.A sixth “yellow vest” protester was killed this week, hit by a truck at a protest roadblock. Despite calls from authorities urging protesters to stop the protests, the movement rocking the country has showed no signs of abating.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Financial sector helps lift Toronto stocks US stocks also climb higher

first_imgTORONTO — Gains in the financial sector helped Canada’s main stock index head higher in late-morning trading.The S&P/TSX composite index was up 35.28 points at 15,081.56.In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average was up 123.79 points at 24,189.38. The S&P 500 index was up 8.28 points at 2,618.58, while the Nasdaq composite was up 27.94 points at 7,051.77.The Canadian dollar traded for 75.47 cents US compared with an average of 75.38 cents US on Tuesday.The February crude contract was down 40 cents at US$51.71 per barrel and the February natural gas contract was up 15.4 cents at US$3.65 per mmBTU.The February gold contract was up US$4.90 at US$1,293.30 an ounce and the March copper contract was up 3.00 cents at US$2.66 a pound. The Canadian Press Companies in this story: (TSX:GSPTSE, TSX:CADUSD=X)last_img read more

Construction on new Northeast Elementarys foundation to begin immediately

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The School District #60’s Board discussed developments on the new Northeast Elementary School during its first meeting of the new school year on Monday.During the meeting, SD60 Assistant Superintendent Doug Boyd explained that construction on the new school’s foundation would start immediately, as the district already hired Yellowridge Construction LTD to manage said construction.“The Northeast school as you are well aware has received approval and will start with soil stipping,” said Boyd. “Our construction management term for this project is Yellowridge, so basically we’ve hired local contractors to do the screening.” The district will now tender a contract for work on the school’s foundation with an award coming in the next few days. Once the district awards the contract, construction will commence as soon as possible.“At this point, it’s only the weather that could give us hiccups or delays.”Boyd added that soil at the new school has already been stripped and moved to Margaret Ma Murray Elementary, where it will be used as a foundation for sod.The new school, which will be built on 86th street and 112th Avenue, is receiving $30.8 million from the province to go towards the project. Northeast Elementary is expected to be completed by the fall of 2021 and will host students from Kindergarten to Grade Six.last_img read more

Taste of the Town kicks off LiveIt Green month in Fort St

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The City of Fort St. John has announced that October is LiveIt! Green Month in the city, and the month-long initiative is kicking off this weekend with an event to promote local businesses using locally-sourced ingredients.LiveIt! Green Month is a month-long initiative that aims to promote and celebrate green projects and activities in the community and to educate citizens on some green ideas they can use in their homes.Each week focuses on a unique topic including food security, water management, waste reduction, and energy literacy. Taste of the Town, which is held from September 29th to October 6th, is a great opportunity for residents and visitors to support local businesses, producers, and restaurants while sampling fresh, locally produced food and beverage.Participating businesses include Whole Wheat & Honey, Fort St. John Farmers’ Market, Hip Peace Produce, Homesteader Health, Beard’s Brewing Co., Mighty Peace Brewing Co., NEAT, and Spicy Fusion.Residents are encouraged to use the Taste of the Town Passport by picking one up at the Fort St. John Visitor Centre or downloading it at www.fortstjohn.ca/taste-town and returning it by October 12 for a chance to win a prize.Additional events during LiveIt! Green month include a Home Game Butchering Workshop, Gardening Series with NEAT, fermentation demonstration, Yard Waste drop-off, Passive House and Water Treatment Facility tours, and various project showcases.More information about the many green activities and projects can be found at www.fortstjohn.ca/liveitgreen.last_img read more

Fate of Atishi Lovely and Gambhir sealed

first_imgNew Delhi: East Delhi woke up to a brisk start as Delhi went to polls on Sunday. The constituency which snail-paced in the morning in terms of voting percentage picked up pace in the afternoon and closed at approximately 61.95, third after North East Delhi which scored 63.45 topping the list followed by Chandni Chowk which came second with 62.69 percent. With this, the fate of AAP candidate from East Delhi Atishi, BJP’s Gautam Gambhir and Congress Arvinder Singh Lovely is locked in the EVMs.The educational background of Atishi is up against the stardom of BJP’s Gautam Gambhir and the experience of Congress candidate Arvinder Singh Lovely. Cricketer-turned-politician Gautam Gambhir, who is also the BJP candidate from east Delhi on Sunday voted along with his wife at a polling station in Old Rajendra Nagar area. “I urge the voters especially the first time voters to come to vote because voting is the biggest power one has. Even the voters should bring in their friends to the polling booths,’ Gambhir urged Delhi residents after casting his vote early morning. However, Atishi felt that women security is the biggest issue which women of east Delhi would vote for. Stepping out after casting her vote she appeared confident of her win. “I think women security is the biggest issue in East Delhi, especially for areas like Trilopuri and kalyanpuri where women struggle with illegal liquor being sold in the areas . It is, however, a clear battle between AAP and BJP and the silent voter has always been a voter of AAP,” Atishi said. “This is not an election for Arvinder Singh Lovely, it is an election for trans Yamuna people. The celebrity status of Gambir won’t work, we have seen Chetan Chauhan earlier, people haven’t seen him again,” Arvinder Singh Lovely said.last_img read more

Approval of legislation eases US government shutdown crisis

first_imgWASHINGTON- US House Representatives approves $1.1 trillion spending billThe Republican led House of Representatives have approved a $1.1 trillion spending bill. The massive spending measure eases many, but not all, of the automatic spending cuts that took effect last year.The legislation was approved with 359 votes against 67 in House which the Republican-controlled mostly. The document, 1,582 pages in length, covers everything from airports to agriculture and is expected by the Federal government to be funded until September 30. The Democratic led Senate is also expected to pass it this week. Lawmakers from both parties had little taste for an election-year standoff that might have triggered another unpopular government shutdown.last_img read more

UAE Suspends Airstrikes Against Islamic State Following Pilot Capture

Rabat – U.S. officials said that the United Arab Emirates, a key member of the US-led coalition against the so-called the Islamic State (IS), has suspended its attacks following the downing of a Jordanian F16 warplane and the capture of its pilot in December, who was later burned alive.“I can confirm that UAE suspended airstrikes shortly after the Jordanian pilot’s went down,” an official told the news agencies AFP and Reuters.According to the New York Times, the UAE cited fears for its pilots’ safety in case of downed planes shortly after Jordanian pilot, Muaz al-Kasasbeh, was captured in late December in IS stronghold of Raqqa in Northern Syria. The United Arab Emirates reportedly wants rescue aircrafts closer if a plane goes down. The Emirati officials warned they would not rejoin the anti-IS coalition if rescue aircrafts were not deployed.According to Al Jazeera, the Emirati pilots will not resume fighting until the Ospreys aircrafts, rescue aircrafts that take off and land like helicopters but fly like planes, are deployed in northern Iraq close to the battlegrounds.The UAE stopped flying combat missions but has remained involved in noncombat roles. “But let me be clear that UAE continues to be an important and valuable partner that is contributing to the coalition,” the official spoke on the condition of anonymity.Morocco is also part of the US-led coalition to fight the terror group. Moroccan F16s had reportedly undertaken around 20 missions against the Islamic State.A source familiar with the issue cited by Telquel Magazine said that in addition to Moroccan F16s, the Moroccan pilots will also pilot Emirati military planes. read more